wireless 9-pin serial/rs232

Discussion in 'Wireless Internet' started by Dan Irwin, Apr 4, 2004.

  1. Dan Irwin

    Dan Irwin Guest

    hi,

    i'm looking for a way to connnect the serial port on the back of my
    dss in my home theater to my pc in my office. I dont reealy want to
    run any wires, so i was wondering if anyone knew of a wireless
    solution?

    thx for the help,

    dan
     
    Dan Irwin, Apr 4, 2004
    #1
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  2. Dan Irwin

    Lucas Tam Guest

    (Dan Irwin) wrote in

    Maybe something like this?

    http://wireless.netserial.net/

    Google is your friend.
     
    Lucas Tam, Apr 4, 2004
    #2
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  3. Dan Irwin

    Dan Irwin Guest

    sorta, but i was hopeing for somthing that just tranmits on its own
    freqence(vs as part of wiFi) and i was hoping for something that has a
    reciver and a sender unit, because that way to your computer there is
    a device hooked into the serial port and thats all it needs to know
     
    Dan Irwin, Apr 5, 2004
    #3
  4. :sorta, but i was hopeing for somthing that just tranmits on its own
    :freqence(vs as part of wiFi) and i was hoping for something that has a
    :reciver and a sender unit, because that way to your computer there is
    :a device hooked into the serial port and thats all it needs to know

    For that last part, it sounds like the 'VirtualCOM' driver supplied
    with the NPort DE-311 (http://wireless.netserial.net/) is pretty
    close.
     
    Walter Roberson, Apr 5, 2004
    #4
  5. Dan Irwin

    James Knott Guest

    Anything that transmits "on it's own frequency", will require a licence.

    --

    Fundamentalism is fundamentally wrong.

    To reply to this message, replace everything to the left of "@" with
    james.knott.
     
    James Knott, Apr 5, 2004
    #5
  6. Dan Irwin

    Dan Irwin Guest

    olny under windows though
     
    Dan Irwin, Apr 5, 2004
    #6
  7. Dan Irwin

    Lucas Tam Guest

    (Dan Irwin) wrote in

    How about bluetooth?

    http://www.gridenabled.com/bt232.html
     
    Lucas Tam, Apr 5, 2004
    #7
  8. |-cnrc.gc.ca (Walter Roberson) wrote in message |> In article <>,
    |> :and i was hoping for something that has a
    |> :reciver and a sender unit, because that way to your computer there is
    |> :a device hooked into the serial port and thats all it needs to know

    |> For that last part, it sounds like the 'VirtualCOM' driver supplied
    |> with the NPort DE-311 (http://wireless.netserial.net/) is pretty
    |> close.


    |olny under windows though

    The NPort has drivers for a number of Unix variants.

    One of the devices I browsed last night acted as a virtual modem:
    connect it up to a serial port, use a few AT-style commands to configure,
    and then you were connected to the remote machine. I believe I found
    that one in a PDF from alphamicro.net but could not find the product
    itself listed on their site.
     
    Walter Roberson, Apr 5, 2004
    #8
  9. :> sorta, but i was hopeing for somthing that just tranmits on its own
    :> freqence(vs as part of wiFi)


    :Anything that transmits "on it's own frequency", will require a licence.

    Not true. There are unlicensed bands of various widths and power and
    modulation requirements. Some of them might require periodic broadcast of a
    station identifier though ;-)

    I seem to recall when I was browsing the FCC regulations, that in some
    cases one did not even require a license to transmit (within certain
    parameters) on commercial radio station frequencies, if one was
    transmitting using "sideband" technologies.

    The details of what can or cannot be done unlicensed in areas under
    FCC jurisdiction are quite complex. For example, a regulation that
    says that you can't transmit beyond a certain power on a certain
    frequency band within a certain distance of a [named] Navy weather
    station, is still a regulation that permits transmission in that
    frequency range provided one is far enough away from that particular
    weather station. Sometimes the licensing requirements are tied to
    which polarization one is using.

    It might take a bunch of research, some hair-splitting, and some
    custom electronics, but WiFi is NOT the only spectrum that can be used
    for data transmission unlicensed.
     
    Walter Roberson, Apr 5, 2004
    #9
  10. Dan Irwin

    Dan Irwin Guest

    Good idea but:

    1. the device and the computer are in two different rooms, and from
    what I've heard Bluetooth has a extremely short range (which is why it
    never overcame wi-fi, just like why USB never overcame Ethernet)
    2. still doesn't is physically hooking anything into a DB9 port (chose
    my wording carefully)
    3. a hell of a lot of money :)
     
    Dan Irwin, Apr 5, 2004
    #10
  11. Dan Irwin

    Dan Irwin Guest

    sry, i missed the post when looking over the new ones, thx for the tip
    a millon, will look into it
     
    Dan Irwin, Apr 5, 2004
    #11
  12. Dan Irwin

    Lucas Tam Guest

    (Dan Irwin) wrote in
    There's different classes of BlueTooth. Class 1 has a range of upto 100m.
    Class 2, has a range of only 10m and is used primarily in cellphones and
    PDAs. There is even a super-low power Class 3 with only a 10cm range.
    I don't get this point? The Bluetooth Serial to Wireless converters look
    like they just end a serial port wirelessly.

    259.00USD is not bad for a wireless product. You'll be hard pressed to
    find anything cheaper as sending serial over wireless is a niche market.

    BTW, here's are some other possibilities:

    http://www.aerocomm.com/
    http://coyotedatacom.com/
    http://www.maxstream.net/
     
    Lucas Tam, Apr 5, 2004
    #12
  13. Dan Irwin

    James Knott Guest

    All those bands are shared with whatever type of equipment. They are
    usually in the "ISM" bands, where all sorts of noise is permitted. A
    dedicated channel, dedicated for your use only, will require a licence.

    --

    Fundamentalism is fundamentally wrong.

    To reply to this message, replace everything to the left of "@" with
    james.knott.
     
    James Knott, Apr 6, 2004
    #13
  14. |> :Anything that transmits "on it's own frequency", will require a licence.

    |> Not true. There are unlicensed bands of various widths and power and

    |All those bands are shared with whatever type of equipment. They are
    |usually in the "ISM" bands, where all sorts of noise is permitted. A
    |dedicated channel, dedicated for your use only, will require a licence.

    The original poster didn't ask for a channel dedicated for his own use:
    he qualified with a "vs" wifi -- that his, he doesn't want the data
    transmission shared with wifi. That still leaves lots of other unlicensed
    possibilities.
     
    Walter Roberson, Apr 6, 2004
    #14
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