What use is WiFi on a Costco Viso TV?

Discussion in 'Wireless Internet' started by Ewald Böhm, Sep 3, 2015.

  1. Ewald Böhm

    Tony Hwang Guest

    Don't think blue tooth is not on the TV. I have an AMD A10 laptop
    dedicated as HTPC. Laptop connects to AC2600 router on 5GHz. My down
    load speed is 50mbps solid. No problem even real time streaming 1080P,4K
    UHD, 3D videos. Native 4K material is rare but A/V receiver upscale to
    4K on 4K 60" set. Our HT is 7.1 set up. Biggest I could afford for the
    family room space. For storage I have small 4 bay Synology NAS with
    4x2TB WD Red drives.(not powerful enough for some codec)
     
    Tony Hwang, Sep 5, 2015
    #21
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  2. Ewald Böhm

    micky Guest

    In sci.electronics.repair, on Sat, 5 Sep 2015 04:43:38 +0000 (UTC),
    I don't have a new tv.
    Thanks but won't work for me. You've come in in the middle of the
    story, Not worth repeating it.
     
    micky, Sep 5, 2015
    #22
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  3. Ewald Böhm

    Tony Hwang Guest

    THat probably is a very good and simple idea. Connecting laptop or
    tablet to use as primary display and big creen TV set as a duplicate
    display.
     
    Tony Hwang, Sep 5, 2015
    #23
  4. Ewald Böhm

    Tony Hwang Guest

    Micky, B4 asking whole bunch of questions, you ought to search for your
    answers on the 'net. Specially Youtube gives lots of visual demos. Be
    specific when you have questions. Like telling us what you have and what
    you are trying to do and what problem you are running into or something
    you don't understand. As far as TV set goes, we're in HDTV era and HDMI
    cable takes care of a/v hook ups. When you mention WiFi, then do you at
    least have a router for your home network in your home?
     
    Tony Hwang, Sep 5, 2015
    #24
  5. Ewald Böhm

    amdx Guest

    Nothing to do with wires, just turning on the tv to watch, it takes to
    to boot,
    and you must wait in order to change the channel.
    Mikek
    before
     
    amdx, Sep 5, 2015
    #25
  6. Ewald Böhm

    Ewald Böhm Guest

    I don't have direct tv.
    My router does not have a coax input.

    I thought that was a coax cable coming out of all those direct tv
    antennas I see on houses.

    If the output of Direct TV is coax, how does that coax get "into" your
    network?

    It can't go through the router.
    How does it get into your router without a coax connector on the router?
     
    Ewald Böhm, Sep 5, 2015
    #26
  7. Ewald Böhm

    Ewald Böhm Guest

    I guess a USB wired mouse and keyboard would be useful.

    Do most of these WiFi TVs have the ability to accept a typical USB mouse
    and keyboard?
     
    Ewald Böhm, Sep 5, 2015
    #27
  8. Ewald Böhm

    Ewald Böhm Guest

    I went over to a friend's house who had a new samsung wifi tv and the
    browsing was so slow that I'd say it's unusable for two reasons:
    1. Typing the URL with the remote was punitive, and,
    2. Once you had the URL, the time to load was interminable.

    This might just be a bad Samsung TV, but, wow. It's great for checkboxes
    but it doesn't work in real time.
     
    Ewald Böhm, Sep 5, 2015
    #28
  9. Ewald Böhm

    micky Guest

    In sci.electronics.repair, on Sat, 5 Sep 2015 12:12:45 -0500, amdx
    That's bad too. I hate my smart phone because it takes so long to turn
    on, and 5 steps to turn off. The "bar" phone I used to use turned on or
    off in a second or two.

    My Philips DVDR, which does it's main job very well but has a bunch of
    design flaws, takes noticeably longer to change channels than does the
    Zenith set-top box.
     
    micky, Sep 5, 2015
    #29
  10. Ewald Böhm

    Ewald Böhm Guest

    The output from the Direct TV is a coax cable, right?
    How does that coax cable connect to your router?
     
    Ewald Böhm, Sep 5, 2015
    #30
  11. Ewald Böhm

    Nil Guest

    It doesn't. The TV network connection is via the common wireless or
    ethernet cable.
     
    Nil, Sep 5, 2015
    #31
  12. A DirecTV box has multiple "outputs". HDMI, component, etc.
    The DirecTV boxes I've had all had an ethernet connection that I
    plugged my home network into. I think some of the newer boxes also
    have wireless capability, or maybe they provide a separate device to
    connect wirelessly. The coax that you see is from the Dish (actually
    from the LNB) to the DirecTV box. The DirecTV box takes care of the
    connection to the internet. It works kind of like the other devices
    that connect to the internet via your home network. I also have a
    Blu-Ray player and it connects to the home network via ethernet also.
     
    Charlie Hoffpauir, Sep 5, 2015
    #32
  13. Ewald Böhm

    Ewald Böhm Guest

    So, help me here.

    Let's say the DirectTV dish is on the roof, and it has a coax cable that
    goes down the side of the house, through a wall, to a wall plate.

    From that wall plate, how does "it" (i.e., the tv signal) get on my
    "network"?

    You said the tv signal gets into the network via either the wireless
    connection or through the wired ethernet (cat5) cable.

    But, how does that coax cable tv signal get to either one of those (i.e.,
    how does the coax connect to the wifi or the ethernet cable)?
     
    Ewald Böhm, Sep 6, 2015
    #33
  14. Ewald Böhm

    Ewald Böhm Guest

    Oh. That explains it!

    So, the coax cable that comes out of the dish on the roof then goes into
    a "box" which has, as outputs, either coax or RJ45 or a wifi antenna?

    Is that correct?
     
    Ewald Böhm, Sep 6, 2015
    #34
  15. Well, the main outputs of a direcTV box are designed to send a signal
    to a TV, so they are the HDMI and the video and audio to the TV or a
    monitor. The Ethernet is just an addition.... there so you can get
    internet access for streaming "stuff" from their web. There's also (on
    my box) an eSATA port so I can connect an external drive, and a USB
    port that I've never seen any reason to use. If there is a coax output
    I've never used it, but I did notice am S-Video port which I've also
    never used. I've never seen a WiFi connection, but then I don't use
    WiFi I use wired connections to connect to the direcTV boxes.
     
    Charlie Hoffpauir, Sep 6, 2015
    #35
  16. If I remember correctly, direcTV has an application called DirecTV to
    PC that you can install on a computer that's on your network, and if
    the DirecTV box is also on the network, you can watch recorded content
    (from your DirecTV recorder) on a computer connected to the network.
    So far as I know, that's the only way to get TV content to your
    computer.

    Years ago, before HD, the DirecTV boxes could be hacked (they run
    under DirecTV's version of Linux) and content could be moved around
    from boxes to computers..... but that's no longer the case.

    The signal in the coax is an encrypted digital signal and requires a
    DirecTV box to decrypt it. The box can then output it as a digital
    signal to a TV (HDMI for example) . To get the signal to a computer
    requires some means of defeating the copy protection built into the
    DirecTV system. I think the DirecTV to PC ap does some of that.
     
    Charlie Hoffpauir, Sep 6, 2015
    #36
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