What does the Wireless ISP (WISP) "see" when I'm using VPN fromhome?

Discussion in 'Wireless Internet' started by Yaroslav Sadowski, Sep 5, 2014.

  1. Yaroslav Sadowski

    Char Jackson Guest

    What you're saying *ONLY* applies to a split tunnel. The OP asked about a
    full tunnel. There's some aspect of 'full tunnel' that you're not getting,
    like the 'fullness' of it.
     
    Char Jackson, Sep 6, 2014
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  2. Yaroslav Sadowski

    Char Jackson Guest

    If you think a split tunnel is the same as a full tunnel, then I have news
    for you.
    Absolutely not true. You can easily check this for yourself.
    That didn't make sense, but I suspect you're still talking about a split
    tunnel, although your description doesn't apply to anything I've seen.
     
    Char Jackson, Sep 6, 2014
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  3. Yaroslav Sadowski

    Char Jackson Guest

    Hopefully, by now you've seen the corrections. You confuse people when you
    give bad info.
    None of that made sense.
     
    Char Jackson, Sep 6, 2014
  4. Yaroslav Sadowski

    Char Jackson Guest

    You're either completely confused or you're simply messing with me. I think
    I know which it is.
     
    Char Jackson, Sep 6, 2014
  5. Yaroslav Sadowski

    Char Jackson Guest

    Do you understand what full tunnel means? Why do you keep saying it doesn't
    matter? Of course it matters.
     
    Char Jackson, Sep 6, 2014
  6. Yaroslav Sadowski

    Char Jackson Guest

    I think I see where the train left the tracks. You don't send traffic "to a
    VPN". You establish a VPN connection, and then you simply send traffic. If
    the VPN is a full tunnel, everything goes into the tunnel. If it's a split
    tunnel, certain traffic goes into the tunnel and the rest doesn't, based on
    your routing table. The VPN provider injects routes into your routing table
    to control what goes into the tunnel and what doesn't.

    Again, for clarity: You don't send traffic to a VPN. You simply send
    traffic, just as you always do.
    Nonsense.
     
    Char Jackson, Sep 6, 2014
  7. Char Jackson wrote, on Sat, 06 Sep 2014 13:30:53 -0500:
    I am thoroughly confused by *every* answer from Caver1, almost as
    if he's trying to confuse me, on purpose.

    What his answer seems to be saying is that the ISP, from the ISP's
    own home (or whatever), can "see" yahoo, google, etc. But, that's
    a dumb question if that's what he thought I had asked.

    I was asking if "I" were on the VPN we've discussed, which appears
    to be a full-vpn solution (http://216.185.105.35/vpnoneclick/),
    and then "I" went to google, yahoo, bittorrent, nntp, etc.,
    could the ISP see two things:

    1. Could the ISP see that I went to those domains?
    2. Could the ISP see what port I was going to?

    Caver1 says yet.
    Char says no.
    I would hope that Char is right.

    Can you confirm if it's yes or no please?
     
    Yaroslav Sadowski, Sep 6, 2014
  8. Yaroslav Sadowski

    Char Jackson Guest

    Oh, good grief. You're too much. :)

    Fake IP, indeed. ;-)
     
    Char Jackson, Sep 6, 2014
  9. Yaroslav Sadowski

    Char Jackson Guest

    You're probably right. Oh well, it was an otherwise slow day and I learned a
    few things. I now know that there's no such thing as a split tunnel, that a
    split tunnel and a full tunnel are the same thing and behave exactly the
    same way, that a VPN is tied to the browser tab that spawned it, and that
    fake IPs can actually be useful.

    It's all a load of crap, of course, but it was new crap, and I always enjoy
    new things.
     
    Char Jackson, Sep 6, 2014
  10. Yaroslav Sadowski

    Char Jackson Guest

    That's a distinct possibility. He's using a combination of gibberish, laced
    with an actual true statement now and then, so it could be intentional. That
    wouldn't be very nice, but it happens.
    You already know my answer. It hasn't changed. :)
     
    Char Jackson, Sep 6, 2014
  11. Yaroslav Sadowski

    Jasen Betts Guest

    did you have to try hard to be that wrong, or does it come naturally?
     
    Jasen Betts, Sep 6, 2014
  12. Yaroslav Sadowski

    Jasen Betts Guest

    it does not, your other posts to date do not esplain how it works,
    they only make claims about its behaviour that do not match how all
    the VPS ever ever heard about work.

    maybe you are describing a web proxy?
     
    Jasen Betts, Sep 6, 2014
  13. Yaroslav Sadowski

    Roger Guest

    ISTM that Caver1 has, all this time, been talking about a
    simple https connection for logging into a company's network
    and calling the company's internal network a VPN. I think that
    explains the fixation with browsers and tabs and what other
    software at the local end cannot do under this circumstance.
     
    Roger, Sep 6, 2014
  14. Char Jackson wrote, on Sat, 06 Sep 2014 16:42:15 -0500:
    Thanks! Yours is the answer that makes sense.
     
    Yaroslav Sadowski, Sep 6, 2014
  15. Well, not really as far as I know. Your routing table needs root
    permissions to change. If setting up a vpn allowed some other system-- the
    remote vpn server-- root permission on your system, it would be a
    horribly insecure system. It is you, in setting up your vpn client, that
    sets up the routing table. Now that may be via software provided by that
    server, which will rewrite your routing table for you. But it would be
    far more secure for you to rewrite your own routing table.
    Otherwise you download software provided by these wonderful people who
    offer you full tunneling vpn service, and now they have root on your
    machine, and can install whatever tracker/hacker software they want.
    Shudder.

    Note in the case of the routing table that Yaroslav posted there was a
    really weird thing. The default route was wlan0. The tun0 (vpn tunnel I
    assume) had a routing entry of
    0.0.0.0 but with a genmask of 128.0.0.0 which suggests that only traffic
    with an IP address greater than 128 in the first octet would be directed
    down the tunnel. That is just weird.



    That is how I understand it too.
    Well, it confuses me as well.
     
    William Unruh, Sep 6, 2014
  16. Yaroslav Sadowski

    Caver1 Guest

    Tell me how your connections are kept when the tunnel is closed.
     
    Caver1, Sep 6, 2014
  17. Yaroslav Sadowski

    Caver1 Guest

    I know what a full tunnel is. All traffic from the connection goes to
    who owns the tunnel.
     
    Caver1, Sep 6, 2014
  18. Yaroslav Sadowski

    Caver1 Guest

    I never said that they were the same> I said the effects are the same
    when they close.

    How if it's not true?

    Why doesn't it make sense? You never explain yourself.
    How does a connection stay open when the route it is using is no longer
    there?
    I'm talking about both types of tunnels.
     
    Caver1, Sep 6, 2014
  19. Yaroslav Sadowski

    Caver1 Guest


    What corrections. All you or the others say is no and it mostly you.
    Show one place where you posted a correction.
    Why not? Explain yourself.
     
    Caver1, Sep 6, 2014
  20. Yaroslav Sadowski

    Caver1 Guest


    Explain yourself. Where am i confused/wrong and if so why. You know
    nothing about my motivations.
     
    Caver1, Sep 6, 2014
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