VoIP Connection Method

Discussion in 'Home Networking' started by Geoff Lane, Jul 15, 2007.

  1. Geoff Lane

    Geoff Lane Guest

    Hi Folks, hopefully I've got this followup-to business sorted now.

    My only experience of VoIP is using earplugs and a mike via Skype so
    connection was made by way of Skype's server.

    I see many modern routers have a phone connection and I read somewhere
    that VoIP connections can be made by dialing the remote IP address but
    I'm not sure if this was manufacturer specific or an option will all
    makes; or is via the server the only reliable method.

    I appreciate that dynamic addresses can pose a problem though.

    Geoff Lane
    FU to uk.comp.home-networking
     
    Geoff Lane, Jul 15, 2007
    #1
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  2. Geoff Lane

    Andy Burns Guest

    Most likely to use SIP (an open standard unlike proprietary SKYPE)
    Where I'll be unlikely to see it.
     
    Andy Burns, Jul 15, 2007
    #2
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  3. Geoff Lane

    Lurch Guest

    VoIP and Skype is a loose term.
    Not a remote IP address, a remote SIP address more likely. Each VoIP
    connection has a connection ID that is basically a unique ID, like a
    phone number.
    Why's that then? I've never seen a problem with dynamic IP's.
    Why? Surely a simple x-post to a couple of groups would have been
    better, and maybe uk.telecom.voip would have been a good one to
    choose?
     
    Lurch, Jul 15, 2007
    #3
  4. Geoff Lane

    Martin² Guest

    That's correct, you can just dial the IP no., e.g. when using real phone
    connected to VoIP router (or via ATA to std router) you just dial
    #123*345*78*90# for IP 123.345.78.90 and if there is a SIP device it should
    ring.
    For more info ask on:
    uk.telecom.voip usenet group
    Regards,
    Martin
     
    Martin², Jul 16, 2007
    #4
  5. Geoff Lane

    Geoff Lane Guest

    Well, when I helped someone out once using VNC, because of their dynamic
    address, they had to phone me with it after logging on.

    DynDNS gets over this of course.
    After a couple of 'protocol' errors using followup-to I thought I'd got
    the hand of posting to more than one group; I have to confess that I do
    not know what a x-post is :-(

    Geoff Lane
     
    Geoff Lane, Jul 16, 2007
    #5
  6. Geoff Lane

    Geoff Lane Guest

    Thanks Martin,

    I'll have a look at that group.

    Geoff Lane
     
    Geoff Lane, Jul 16, 2007
    #6
  7. Geoff Lane

    Lurch Guest

    That's VNC, this is VoIP.
    Why not leave the followup as the same as the groups you are posting
    to?
     
    Lurch, Jul 16, 2007
    #7
  8. Geoff Lane

    Lenny_Nero Guest

    Lurch said

    Just post in one group or if *you* really feel the need two and have the
    thread follow in both.

    I have seen many of your posts in groups but because of the FU being set
    to another group not bothered to reply (as I expect have many others),
    there is not any real need to cross post (Xpost), or have the follow up
    set to another group ...do you see any others doing it ? Its use is more
    for an announcement to cover a range of groups, or for bin posting.

    IMO your doing yourself more harm than good.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crossposting
    http://lipas.uwasa.fi/~ts/http/crospost.html
    http://groups.google.com/group/alt.newbie/msg/5949b32c718ed1c1?dmode=source&hl=en

    L.
     
    Lenny_Nero, Jul 17, 2007
    #8
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