VDSL Router that can handle /29 subnet

Discussion in 'Broadband' started by Phil W Lee, Aug 30, 2014.

  1. Phil W Lee

    Phil W Lee Guest

    Any recommendations?

    I'd rather use my own combined unit than the BT VDSL modem and a
    router, as I'd much prefer to be able to see things like line stats,
    which the BT box doesn't give. I'm also out of sockets on the UPS, so
    having a single box instead of two would simplify things.

    Finding out if routers really route or are just NAT gateways is
    surprisingly difficult - most documentation seems to be dumbed down,
    and doesn't seem to know the difference, so I'd prefer to find out if
    someone has actual experience of one that definitely works properly
    for routing a \29 subnet, and ideally having IPv6 for when that
    arrives here in Zen-land.
     
    Phil W Lee, Aug 30, 2014
    #1
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  2. Phil W Lee

    Bob Eager Guest

    I'm using a Vigor 2860. It does IPv6 (although I've only tried that
    minimally so far).

    I am using it as combined router and modem, and routing a /26 subnet with
    no problems. I don't use NAT at all.
     
    Bob Eager, Aug 30, 2014
    #2
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  3. All routers route. NAT is a superset of routing, not a a subset.
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Aug 30, 2014
    #3
  4. Phil W Lee

    Andy Burns Guest

    If you're feeling flush, how about a Cisco 887VA (or 887VA-V which also
    has a few VoIP interfaces so could save another outlet on the UPS if you
    use an ATA) they crop up on eBay
     
    Andy Burns, Aug 30, 2014
    #4
  5. Phil W Lee

    Bob Eager Guest

    The other useful features are:
    - an ethernet port you can use for the BT modem as an alternate
    connection. Useful if you have a problem and BT have to call.
    - a USB port where you can attach a 3G modem for fallback.
     
    Bob Eager, Aug 30, 2014
    #5
  6. Ther are a few routers that have VDSL modems inside rather than etherent
    to the BT kit stuff.

    Billion do some. I like billion gear although the user interface is from
    hell, consisting in giving you access to every possible tunable in the
    chipset in no particular way and very little explanation.

    http://www.trustedreviews.com/asus-dsl-n66u_Peripheral_review

    is the ASUS offering and I rather like the look of it
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Aug 30, 2014
    #6
  7. Phil W Lee

    Andy Burns Guest

    In case I wasn't clear enough, the 877VA *does* have VDSL2/ADSL2+ modem
    inbuilt.
     
    Andy Burns, Aug 30, 2014
    #7
  8. Phil W Lee

    Andy Burns Guest

    Oops typo, the 887 (not the 877 which I do have for ADSL2, and the 837 I
    had before for ADSL1).
     
    Andy Burns, Aug 30, 2014
    #8
  9. No argument there. but the Cisco is bloody expensive. I was noting the
    more 'commercial' alternatives.

    Perhaps that should have read

    "There are a few OTHER routers that have VDSL modems inside"
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Aug 30, 2014
    #9
  10. Phil W Lee

    Andy Burns Guest

    New yes, but S/H on eBay in the past few weeks, a couple have gone for
    under £20 inc P&P
     
    Andy Burns, Aug 30, 2014
    #10
  11. Phil W Lee

    grinch Guest



    I use a Cisco 867VAE built in VDSL2 and Gig Ethernet Wan, but not at
    the same time its an either or option.

    Gets rid of the BT provided room heater and runs much cooler .

    It is a normal Cisco so /32 or /29 /24 /16 /8 is not a problem .

    Only downside is it does not support all the normal routing protocols
    just BGP and RIP2. I doubt that will be an issue to most people here.

    I downloaded a new version of opensuse sometime ago and the 5 minute
    average download speed was 50meg (FTTC) but I don't know what the
    throughput is if you use the 2 gig Ethernet ports as Wan and LAN no
    doubt www.cisco.com will tell you.

    They are about £250 new but I paid £140 for mine, It was second hand but
    had not been used ,I think the wan option confused someone and the sold it.
     
    grinch, Aug 30, 2014
    #11
  12. Phil W Lee

    Bob Eager Guest

    I should also add that I had very good support from Draytek when I found
    something obscure that didn't work. They had a fix within a few days.

    About £170 new.

    http://www.draytek.co.uk/products/business/vigor-2860
     
    Bob Eager, Aug 30, 2014
    #12
  13. Phil W Lee

    Phil W Lee Guest

    Hmm, that's a fair bit pricier than the Billion Bipac alternative.
    Do you know if the Draytek Vigor 2760 will route a subnet as well?
    They seem to be quite a bit less spendy.
    I downloaded the manual, but it wasn't clear on the subject, and
    concentrated on singing NATs praises (of which I'm well aware, I use
    it behind my firewall).
    You can't get at the FAQs in their site without registering with a
    serial number :(
     
    Phil W Lee, Aug 31, 2014
    #13
  14. Phil W Lee

    Bob Eager Guest

    Sorry, I don't.
     
    Bob Eager, Aug 31, 2014
    #14
  15. Phil W Lee

    Bob Eager Guest

    Well, mine sits on a /29 and obviously that is routed implicitly. But I
    did need to be able to add a static route for the /26 I also have.
     
    Bob Eager, Aug 31, 2014
    #15
  16. Pretty much any router in that class will route a subnet.

    Its only the uber noddy <£30 consumer stuff that wont...

    Draytek are good but overstyled and pricy. For me if I were you it would
    be between Billion and Asus. Or a S/H cisco.

    I loved my Billion but it went weird after a few years and i think a
    particularly severe storm.

    Now on SH cisco
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Aug 31, 2014
    #16
  17. +1.

    In fact all you have to do is give the LAN adress a /29 subnet address
    and you are in business.
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Aug 31, 2014
    #17
  18. Phil W Lee

    Phil W Lee Guest

    Which some so called routers don't allow.
    Fritz!Box, for example, do not have any means of disabling NAT and
    will only allow subnets ending in zero and from the RFC 1918 private
    ranges on their internal interface.
    Confirmed by their Tech support in email.
    So it's completely unusable for anything but a single public IP
    address.

    Heavily disreccomended by me, not just for that reason, but because
    they disguise that significant detail by omitting it from any of their
    sales documentation.
    I wonder what else doesn't work, if the first thing I tried didn't?
     
    Phil W Lee, Aug 31, 2014
    #18
  19. Phil W Lee

    Bob Eager Guest

    Of course they do. But it's like this:

    ISP <--VDSL-->myrouter(on /29)<--myfirewall-->mynetwork(on /26)

    So the router needs a static route to the /26 as well.
     
    Bob Eager, Aug 31, 2014
    #19
  20. His ISP might have, but his internal machines will have a default route
    to the router, and so that itself will need to know what subnets are
    attached

    Normally if you are running tow subnets internally you would have two
    internet addresses on the router, one for each subnet.

    So I am not clear how he achieved stuff without it
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Sep 1, 2014
    #20
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