Using tow LAN connectors on desktop mainboard

Discussion in 'Home Networking' started by Roger R, Apr 16, 2008.

  1. Roger R

    Roger R Guest

    My XP desktop mainboard (Asus) has two ethernet LAN connectors.
    One 100T Mb speed, the other a gigabyte speed.

    Mainboard manual has no guide for implementation of these connectors.

    I thought to use the 100 speed for connection to router and then internet,
    and to use the high speed connector to link to a Win98 machine that I have
    fitted with gigabyte speed card. This doesn't seem to work however.

    The 100 speed connector works fine for the router modem internet, but the
    high speed link to the other machine doesn't work at all, and knocks the
    internet connection out when enabled.

    What might be the intended purpose of these two LAN connectors?

    Is a simple network linking two machines using a high speed connection and
    the low speed connection for the router, possible using these LAN
    connectors?

    Roger R
     
    Roger R, Apr 16, 2008
    #1
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  2. Roger R

    PeeGee Guest

    With 100Mb, you would use a cross-over cable to connect the computers -
    don't know if there is an equivalent for Gigabit :-(

    Otherwise, you will need a gigabit switch or one of the NICs to be
    capable of presenting the equivalent interface (effectively appearing to
    be a switch).

    --
    PeeGee

    The reply address is a spam trap. All mail is reported as spam.
    "Nothing should be able to load itself onto a computer without the
    knowledge or consent of the computer user. Software should also be able
    to be removed from a computer easily."
    Peter Cullen, Microsoft Chief Privacy Strategist (Computing 18 Aug 05)
     
    PeeGee, Apr 16, 2008
    #2
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  3. Roger R

    Jon Guest

    It's possible, but it requires a degree of understanding of IP
    addressing etc.

    Can you noy just link the win98 machine to the router also?
     
    Jon, Apr 17, 2008
    #3
  4. Roger R

    Roger R Guest

    Yes I can do that...the router/modem is 4 port 100T...but then the XP >
    Win98 link is only 100T and I want to transfere large...2Gb video files.

    Connecting all three...XP, Win98 and router/modem...to a gigabyte switch
    works fine but I was worried about the vulnerability of the win98 machine
    as, apart from that in the router/modem, it has no separate firewall. The
    XP machine has third party (Zone Alarm) firewall, but that is not available
    for win98.

    I thought it might improve the security of the win98 machine if it could
    only be reached through the XP machine by putting it on a dedicated gigabyte
    link using the other ethernet connector. Presumably if this were achieved
    it would not have access to the internet...or would it?

    ....perhaps that was the previous trouble...it was also set up with TCP/IP
    giving internet access and conflicted with the XP machine TCP/IP.

    Roger R
     
    Roger R, Apr 17, 2008
    #4
  5. Roger R

    Rob Morley Guest

    Previous version are available here:

    download.zonelabs.com/bin/free/information/znalm/zaReleaseHistory.html

    I think the 5.X versions ran on W98, but I can't remember - I switched
    to Kerio Personal Firewall which was much better. It's long since been
    discontinued but can still download it here:

    http://web.archive.org/web/20040404180545/http://www.kerio.com/dwn/kpf/k
    erio-pf-2.1.5-en-win.exe

    http://tinyurl.com/6yp8ea
    Not unless you were running software to let the two networks talk to
    each other.
    If properly configured the two networks should have no effect on each
    other at all.
     
    Rob Morley, Apr 17, 2008
    #5
  6. Roger R

    Jon Guest

    The forewall in the router will offer sufficient protection from
    incoming stuff. Zone alarm is good at stopping outgoing stuff, so as
    long as you dont habitually click on things you shouldnt you ought to be
    allright.

    The win98 machine will still be behnd the router/firewall, it won't be
    exposed.
    You could, but it would take a lot of buggering about. I think what you
    describing is called bridging? If so, one way of doing it would be on
    the XP machine go to network connections, highlight the 2 connections by
    holding CTRL and clicking on them both, then right-click and choose
    "bridge".

    I've never had occasion to use it so I don't know 100% of the above is
    true, but it rings a bell.
     
    Jon, Apr 18, 2008
    #6
  7. Roger R

    PeeGee Guest

    What you are describing is Internet Connection Sharing (ICS), though
    IIRC it was originally used to allow a network to use a single computer
    with an analogue modem - I used it with two Win98 systems - though I
    don't see why another NIC couldn't be used. It is still available in XP.

    --
    PeeGee

    The reply address is a spam trap. All mail is reported as spam.
    "Nothing should be able to load itself onto a computer without the
    knowledge or consent of the computer user. Software should also be able
    to be removed from a computer easily."
    Peter Cullen, Microsoft Chief Privacy Strategist (Computing 18 Aug 05)
     
    PeeGee, Apr 18, 2008
    #7
  8. Roger R

    Alex Fraser Guest

    Gigabit Ethernet interfaces are required to work with cables wired
    straight through or like a "normal" cross-over (ie two pairs crossed),
    so the cable is a non-issue.

    Alex
     
    Alex Fraser, Apr 19, 2008
    #8
  9. Roger R

    Rob Morley Guest

    Fraser
    says...
    My mistake. That's what I get with a crap memory and relying on Google
    too much. :-\ But I'm sure there was something about cables that work
    with slower ethernet but not gigabit - was it just that pins 4,5,7,8
    weren't connected, were connected wrongly ... ?
     
    Rob Morley, Apr 19, 2008
    #9
  10. Roger R

    Alex Fraser Guest

    Actually, that's true - I have seen some cables with only two pairs,
    which clearly won't work at gigabit speed. The same would presumably
    apply if the "spare" pairs are randomly connected. And finally, signal
    integrity could be an issue (I've not tried "crap" cables at gigabit,
    but I've seen cables which don't work well at 100Mbit, but are fine at
    10Mbit).

    Alex
     
    Alex Fraser, Apr 19, 2008
    #10
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