Switch or Router/Switch?

Discussion in 'Network Routers' started by Jon Danniken, Jul 6, 2011.

  1. Jon Danniken

    Jon Danniken Guest

    Hello, I am currently using a cable modem with one computer (winxp). I
    would like to have internet access on another computer, and am not
    interested in using Windows ICS. I would also like to be able to set it up
    so that the second computer can have access to certain shared files on the
    first computer.

    I can get either of these two products cheaply, used, locally. Which one
    would serve me the best?

    http://www.amazon.com/Cisco-Linksys-EtherFast-Router-4-Port-Switch/dp/B00004SB92
    (linksys BEFSR41 r4)

    or

    http://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-FS116-Ethernet-Switch-Uplink/dp/B000063UZW
    (netgear FS116)


    Thanks,

    Jon
     
    Jon Danniken, Jul 6, 2011
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Jon Danniken

    Char Jackson Guest

    Of the two, only the Linksys will work for you.

    The Netgear is only a switch. It would allow you to share files
    between the two computers, but to share a single Internet connection
    you need a router. Hence, you need the Linksys, which includes a
    switch in the same housing with the router.
     
    Char Jackson, Jul 6, 2011
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Jon Danniken

    Jon Danniken Guest

    Thanks Char. If I did just want to connect the two computers (with the
    second computer not having internet access), would a crossover cable use the
    same networking hardware that the switch would?

    I had some trouble in the past getting two windows computers to be able to
    share files, and I was wondering if getting the switch would make this any
    easier.

    Jon
     
    Jon Danniken, Jul 6, 2011
    #3
  4. Jon Danniken

    Char Jackson Guest

    Yes, a crossover cable can be used to make a physical connection
    between two computers. You still need to make sure the IP addressing
    is correct, of course, before they'll be able to talk to each other
    and share files.

    If your computers only have a single Ethernet port and you want
    Internet access at the same time as your PC-PC connection, then the
    switch will help out. It can be a standalone switch like the Netgear,
    or a built-in switch like in the Linksys.
    As you said above, a direct PC-PC connection requires a crossover
    cable, while using a switch generally requires two straight-thru
    cables. (Modern networking gear can be surprisingly tolerant of using
    the wrong type of cables.)

    Other than that, no, a switch shouldn't make filesharing any easier,
    nor any harder. It's about the same either way.
     
    Char Jackson, Jul 7, 2011
    #4
  5. Jon Danniken

    Jon Danniken Guest

    Okay, thanks again. I do have two NICs in the main computer, so using a
    crossover cable will be what I'll do. I have WinXP Pro on the main
    computer, so I'll try again to network the other computer to it using
    Windows software.

    Jon
     
    Jon Danniken, Jul 7, 2011
    #5
  6. Jon Danniken

    ken Guest

    Char,

    Just a little additional info for your knowledge base. Here, my ISP will
    hand out up to 5 addresses through a single modem. So if I use a switch
    to connect to the modem, each device (up to the 5 max) connected to the
    switch will get a valid IP address from the ISP. I don't know if the
    computers would be able to see each other (I kind of doubt it, I think
    the ISP stops that, but I don't know).

    One thing this allows me to do is to connect a switch to the modem and
    then two routers to the switch. I can set one router to be available for
    guests and the other for my own use and I don't have to worry that
    guests can get on my network.

    ken
     
    ken, Jul 8, 2011
    #6
  7. Jon Danniken

    Char Jackson Guest

    Thanks, Ken. It's been over a dozen years since my own ISP offered
    multiple IP's (without asking for more money) so I tend to forget
    about it. Thanks for the reminder.
     
    Char Jackson, Jul 8, 2011
    #7
  8. Jon Danniken

    Jon Danniken Guest


    Okay, I've got a followup question on this. The cable I used to connect the
    two computers (NIC to NIC) is a straight-thru cable, and not a crossover
    cable. I can ping each computer from the other one, and also ping each
    computer by it's name. I can also use ICS between the two computers (after
    disabling zonealarm - another issue among several).

    Is this sufficient enough of a test to determine that I don't need a
    crossover cable?

    Thanks,

    Jon
     
    Jon Danniken, Jul 11, 2011
    #8
  9. Jon Danniken

    Char Jackson Guest

    Sounds to me like it's working just fine. Rock on.
     
    Char Jackson, Jul 11, 2011
    #9
  10. Jon Danniken

    Jon Danniken Guest

    Okay good, thanks Char. BTW, know of any good groups for setting up MS
    Windows Networking?

    Jon
     
    Jon Danniken, Jul 11, 2011
    #10
  11. Jon Danniken

    Char Jackson Guest

    There are tons of resources available, but I've been steering folks to
    <http://www.practicallynetworked.com/> for a long time. It seems like
    most of the Usenet networking groups are close to dead. Maybe someone
    else has a good recommendation.
     
    Char Jackson, Jul 11, 2011
    #11
  12. Jon Danniken

    Jon Danniken Guest

    Thanks Char, I'll poke around in there and see what I can come up with; I
    appreciate the help.

    Jon
     
    Jon Danniken, Jul 11, 2011
    #12
  13. Jon Danniken

    moonkhan789

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2011
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    The Netgear is only a switch tool. It would allow you to share files
    among the two PCs, but to share a single Internet connection
    you need a router .
     
    moonkhan789, Aug 4, 2011
    #13
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.