security risk combining 802.11g adapters with 802.11b adapters?

Discussion in 'Wireless Internet' started by Jeff Malka, Dec 13, 2003.

  1. Jeff Malka

    Jeff Malka Guest

    I've been told by a computer salesman that if I combine a 802.11g adapter on
    one PC with a 802.11b adapter on another, the resulting wireless LAN will be
    less secure. Is that true?

    --

    Jeff McPherson
    Email address deliberately false to avoid spam

    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free by AVG
     
    Jeff Malka, Dec 13, 2003
    #1
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  2. :I've been told by a computer salesman that if I combine a 802.11g adapter on
    :eek:ne PC with a 802.11b adapter on another, the resulting wireless LAN will be
    :less secure. Is that true?

    Not that I can think of.

    What the rep might have been talking about is that the 11g adapter
    probably supported WPA (and might have supported 802.1x) but most 11b
    adapters support only WEP (there's probably exceptions by now.) WEP has
    known insecurities; I have seen some claims that the 40 bit version of
    it can be cracked within minutes, but the only thing I've seen
    confirmed is that it can be cracked after several gigabytes (which
    would normally imply days or weeks, depending on your transmission
    volumes.)
     
    Walter Roberson, Dec 13, 2003
    #2
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  3. Jeff Malka

    Ross Evans Guest

    Q: What's the difference between a computer salesman and a used-car
    salesman?

    A: The car salesman knows when he's lying to you.
     
    Ross Evans, Dec 13, 2003
    #3
  4. Jeff Malka

    Jeff Malka Guest

    Thank you.

    --

    Jeff McPherson
    Email address deliberately false to avoid spam

    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free by AVG
     
    Jeff Malka, Dec 13, 2003
    #4
  5. Jeff Malka

    RN Guest

    ---> My reply to what Jeff Malka wrote 12/13/2003 4:15:09 PM

    I would think you are correct about the WPA vs WEP issue, that is the only
    thing that I can think of that would be different.

    While it is true that WEP can be broken ( the 40 bit with brute force and the
    104 bit after collection of a lot of data) it is important to remember that
    WEP is only part of a secure setup. Restricting MAC addresses, changing your
    password and WEP key often, turning authentication off and disabling ESSID
    (if possible and on a home system) broadcasts off can also improve security.
    You also want to minimise your 'foot print' or the signal from your system
    outside your house or building but that will still allow your needed
    components to access the system with good quality.

    Depending on how you are using this wireless system the increased cost of
    replacing the 802.11b components with 802.11g components may or may not be
    worth the cost. You have to consider your risk. If you are using this system
    on a small home network, you are not on a main path your risk is much less
    than if you have a large business system with sensitive information.

    I would make sure the new g system components all can use WPA or else I see
    little benefit of upgrading the whole system.

    ----------------------- Original Message ------------------------------
    [Some portions of this message may have been removed]

    --------------------- Original Message Ends ------------------------
     
    RN, Dec 13, 2003
    #5
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