Reconfiguring the Technicolor TG582n FTTC router from Plusnet

Discussion in 'Broadband' started by David, Jul 19, 2014.

  1. David

    David Guest

    I have a number of legacy devices on my network with static IP addresses in
    the 10.0.0.x range, and not wanting to reconfigure all these legacy devices,
    I have reconfigured my Technicolor TG582n FTTC router to work with this
    range.

    All has gone well but can someone enlighten me why under the tab "Home >
    Home Network > Interfaces > LocalNetwork" under "Local IP Addresses/ IPv4
    Address/Mask" there is an IP address 10.0.0.138 listed.

    The shipping default for the router/gateway is 192.168.1.254 so why the
    10.0.0.138? Normally the 10.0.0.138 falls within the address range I use
    for my DHCP Pool.

    Can I safely delete the 10.0.0.138 address from the "Local IP Addresses/
    IPv4 Address/Mask" table?

    TIA

    David
     
    David, Jul 19, 2014
    #1
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  2. David

    newshound Guest

    If I might piggy-back with a somewhat comparable issue, I have recently
    acquired one of these with FTTC and it talks to a Netgear WN2000RPT wifi
    extender in my office. I used to use static IP addressing for the office
    printers but discovered that dynamic addressing (apparently) worked when
    I first set it up.

    The Technicolour doesn't seem to be quite as programmable as the
    original Netgear router, but I'm not very well up on all the networking
    acronyms. I *think* the extender is doing the DHCP, is that right?
    Trouble is, when I shut down the computers and printers they sometimes
    wake up with new IP addresses, so I then have to reinstall the printers
    and remember to set them to duplex, which is a PITA. I also have a
    switch to distribute the connection, but the printers are all plugged
    into ports in the extender. The extender isn't normally powered down.

    I guess I am making a simple mistake, but can anyone tell me what it is?
     
    newshound, Jul 19, 2014
    #2
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  3. David

    David Guest

    "newshound" wrote in message

    If I might piggy-back with a somewhat comparable issue, I have recently
    acquired one of these with FTTC and it talks to a Netgear WN2000RPT wifi
    extender in my office. I used to use static IP addressing for the office
    printers but discovered that dynamic addressing (apparently) worked when
    I first set it up.

    The Technicolour doesn't seem to be quite as programmable as the
    original Netgear router, but I'm not very well up on all the networking
    acronyms. I *think* the extender is doing the DHCP, is that right?
    Trouble is, when I shut down the computers and printers they sometimes
    wake up with new IP addresses, so I then have to reinstall the printers
    and remember to set them to duplex, which is a PITA. I also have a
    switch to distribute the connection, but the printers are all plugged
    into ports in the extender. The extender isn't normally powered down.

    I guess I am making a simple mistake, but can anyone tell me what it is?


    =========================================================

    I don't think I'm going to answer your query, but you may find the following
    helpful.

    Until fairly recently I used a separate Wireless Access Point for Wi-Fi
    connectivity. If I correctly recall, the WAP - a D-Link unit -could be
    indeed be configured to provide it's own generated DHCP but I always had my
    WAP's DHCP function turned off and allowed the DHCP from the router.

    I found that using a separate WAP worked very well for me and provided a lot
    of flexibility.

    A number of my network devices are configured for static IP addresses. It's
    only my "portable" devices which have their addresses assigned by the DHCP.

    I agree that the modern routers aren't quite a flexible as the older units,
    but I guess that the modern units cover the needs of 99.99% of users.
    Another thing which I can't find on the Technicolor TG582n is the facility
    to enter the MAC addresses of permitted Wi-Fi devices to provide an
    additional layer of security.

    BTW I've never had much luck with Netgear products - my most recent router
    before going to FTTC was a Cisco/Netsys WAG120N which did work very well.
    The WAG120N is configurable for FTTC use and I did initially try to use it,
    but the Technicolor TG582n permitted a higher throughput. Actually I'm quite
    impressed by the TG582n - it's much better than it would have thought for a
    ISP provided "freebee" router!
     
    David, Jul 19, 2014
    #3
  4. As far as I know yes. It's a second IP address on the same interface.
    I did find it useful when I had a complex bridged networking setup,
    to be able to route that IP out of a non-bridged interface and access
    the router's controls. But I don't think it's needed normally.

    Nick
     
    Nick Leverton, Jul 19, 2014
    #4
  5. David

    David Guest

    "Nick Leverton" wrote in message
    As far as I know yes. It's a second IP address on the same interface.
    I did find it useful when I had a complex bridged networking setup,
    to be able to route that IP out of a non-bridged interface and access
    the router's controls. But I don't think it's needed normally.

    Nick

    ===============================================================

    I think you're correct. It just seems odd that it's been included as a
    standard configuration for a domestic router.

    At the moment I can log on to the router using three different addresses! I
    don't even really need the 192.168.1.254 address but it doesn't cause me
    problems with my desired configuration so I may as well leave it.
     
    David, Jul 19, 2014
    #5
  6. Network MASK is not an IP address.
    It is a bitmask to determine the SIZE of the network in use.

    ..138 is the 8th bit set, (128) and then 10, which is 11000
    so a mask of 10001010.

    Which is weird.
    And makes absolutely no sense.

    So Id delete it.

    I am sure you can. I generally 'reset to factory defaults' as a matter
    of course when putting in a new router.


    What you want to do is give the router itself a static address in the
    range in which your devices are, like 10.0.0.254 or 10.0.0.1,

    Then set up the netmask to cover all of the devices. If they are all
    10.0.0.X stuff the net mask wants to be 255.255.255.0 so the whole 256
    address subnet is enabled.


    Then make your DHCP pool a range where the static stuff is not, out of
    that space.
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Jul 19, 2014
    #6
  7. David

    Roger Mills Guest

    Well you certainly wouldn't use a netmask of 10.0.0.138 ! The leading
    bits of the 32 bits need all to be 1's and the rest all 0's - with only
    one transition between them.

    A netmask of 255.255.255.0 (which is common) would mean that each device
    on the local network would have to have an IP address which shared the
    first 3 octets with that of the gateway and with a unique number in the
    range 0-255 (or maybe one or two are excluded?) as the 4th octet.

    So in the OP's case all devices would have IP addresses of 10.0.0.xxx

    So I'm at a loss to understand how he can log on to the router from a
    device having a 192.168 etc. IP address!

    I'm also at a bit of a loss to understand where the .138 address came
    from. Surely, if the OP reconfigured it away from its default it would
    have a LAN IP address of whatever he specified? This would also be the
    gateway address which other devices would have to use for internet access.
    --
    Cheers,
    Roger
    ____________
    Please reply to Newsgroup. Whilst email address is valid, it is seldom
    checked.
     
    Roger Mills, Jul 19, 2014
    #7
  8. I doubt it. If it's just an extender or ethernet bridge (and it seems
    to be both), then the router (TG582n) will be handing out IP
    addresses. By default I think DHCP starts at 192.168.1.64 so addresses
    from 2 to 63 are OK to use for static addresses.

    You can change this in the router config pages if you'd rather have
    dynamic addresses starting from a different number (or if you need
    more than 62 printers).
    Yes. Set static addresses on your printers, and then they won't keep
    changing. In fact, set static addresses for everything that's actually
    static, and leave DHCP for smartphones, pads and laptops.

    Rod.
     
    Roderick Stewart, Jul 19, 2014
    #8
  9. David

    David Guest

    "Roger Mills" wrote in message
    So I'm at a loss to understand how he can log on to the router from a
    device having a 192.168 etc. IP address!

    I'm also at a bit of a loss to understand where the .138 address came
    from. Surely, if the OP reconfigured it away from its default it would
    have a LAN IP address of whatever he specified? This would also be the
    gateway address which other devices would have to use for internet access.


    ==============================================================
    Roger,

    I can confirm that I can actually log on to the router using three IP
    addresses - the 192.168.1.254 default shipping address - it's new 10.0.0.x
    address, and the 10.0.0.138 address! I have yet to delete the 10.0.0.138
    address.

    And I don't know where the 10.0.0.138 address came from either! This was the
    reason for my original posting.

    The router as shipped had 192.168.1.254 as it's gateway address.

    It is now happily assigning 10.0.0.x addresses to my devices from it's DHCP
    pool


    Regards

    David
     
    David, Jul 20, 2014
    #9
  10. David

    Roger Mills Guest

    Odd. According to my paradynes, routers don't work like that - so I'm
    obviously missing something!

    What gateway address and netmask are used by the computers connected to
    the router?
    --
    Cheers,
    Roger
    ____________
    Please reply to Newsgroup. Whilst email address is valid, it is seldom
    checked.
     
    Roger Mills, Jul 20, 2014
    #10
  11. David

    David Guest

    "Roger Mills" wrote in message
    Odd. According to my paradynes, routers don't work like that - so I'm
    obviously missing something!

    What gateway address and netmask are used by the computers connected to
    the router?
    --
    Cheers,
    Roger
    ===============================================================

    I didn't think so either.

    The IP address of this PC is 10.0.0.100. The net mask is 255.255.255.0

    Regards

    David
     
    David, Jul 20, 2014
    #11
  12. David

    David Guest

    "David" wrote in message


    "Roger Mills" wrote in message
    Odd. According to my paradynes, routers don't work like that - so I'm
    obviously missing something!

    What gateway address and netmask are used by the computers connected to
    the router?
    --
    Cheers,
    Roger
    ===============================================================

    I didn't think so either.

    The IP address of this PC is 10.0.0.100. The net mask is 255.255.255.0

    Regards

    David

    ==============================================================

    I've just checked again and can still still access the router with
    192.168.1.254

    Go figure.

    David
     
    David, Jul 20, 2014
    #12
  13. David

    Roger Mills Guest

    And what Gateway address is it using? I would expect that to be Router's
    LAN address. If it's a Windows PC, you can find it in the same place in
    Network Settings that you go to to specify a static IP address. Or it
    will be displayed under one or other of the LAN adapters if you type
    "ipconfig /all" (without the quotes) at a command prompt.
    Wish I could! With a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0, the addresses
    10.0.0.100 and 192.168.1.254 are on entirely different subnets - and
    shouldn't be able to see each other!

    Is it a Windows PC? If so, could there be a HOSTS or LMHOSTS file down
    in the bowels which is doing some address translation?

    What happens if you type "Tracert 192.168.1.254" at a command prompt?
    --
    Cheers,
    Roger
    ____________
    Please reply to Newsgroup. Whilst email address is valid, it is seldom
    checked.
     
    Roger Mills, Jul 20, 2014
    #13
  14. David

    David Guest

    "Roger Mills" wrote in message
    And what Gateway address is it using?


    10.0.0.2


    Wish I could! With a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0, the addresses
    10.0.0.100 and 192.168.1.254 are on entirely different subnets - and
    shouldn't be able to see each other!

    Agreed.

    Is it a Windows PC? Yes - Windows 7


    If so, could there be a HOSTS or LMHOSTS file down
    in the bowels which is doing some address translation?

    Can't find either.


    What happens if you type "Tracert 192.168.1.254" at a command prompt?



    I get


    Tracing route to dsl.device.lan [192.168.1.254] over a maximum of 30 hops

    1 <1 ms <1 ms 1 ms dsl.device.lan [192.168.1.254]

    Trace complete
     
    David, Jul 20, 2014
    #14
  15. It's in there somewhere - I have it turned on.

    I can't poke around and find it though because I don't have the admin
    password here. (It's in the house, I'm at the end of the garden and
    there's a thunderstorm)

    Andy
     
    Vir Campestris, Jul 20, 2014
    #15
  16. David

    Roger Mills Guest

    Interesting. On my computer - where the router address *is*
    192.168.1.254, it simply says: Tracing route to 192.168.1.254 over a max
    .. . .

    I wonder where your association of that address with "dsl.device.lan"
    comes from?
    --
    Cheers,
    Roger
    ____________
    Please reply to Newsgroup. Whilst email address is valid, it is seldom
    checked.
     
    Roger Mills, Jul 20, 2014
    #16
  17. David

    Adrian C Guest

    Local domain feature of the modem.

    Can be viewed and set from the telnet CLI.

    :dns server config ...

    I find it quite useful, I can refer to my IP devices by name rather than IP.

    e.g. printer.myhouse.lan, tivo.myhouse.lan
     
    Adrian C, Jul 21, 2014
    #17
  18. David

    Adrian C Guest

    There is some jiggery pokery in the units routing table, that routes
    packets between the subnets.

    From telnet, type

    :ip rtlist
     
    Adrian C, Jul 21, 2014
    #18
  19. David

    David Guest

    "Roger Mills" wrote in message
    Interesting. On my computer - where the router address *is*
    192.168.1.254, it simply says: Tracing route to 192.168.1.254 over a max
    .. . .

    I wonder where your association of that address with "dsl.device.lan"
    comes from?

    ======================================================

    Dunno - that's the response I got with tracert

    Regards

    David
     
    David, Jul 21, 2014
    #19
  20. David

    David Guest

    "Vir Campestris" wrote in message

    It's in there somewhere - I have it turned on.

    I can't poke around and find it though because I don't have the admin
    password here. (It's in the house, I'm at the end of the garden and
    there's a thunderstorm)

    Andy

    ======================================================

    It would be very much appreciated if you could let me know in due course.

    Regards

    David
     
    David, Jul 21, 2014
    #20
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