Questions about new line installation

Discussion in 'Broadband' started by Murmansk, Aug 25, 2015.

  1. Murmansk

    Murmansk Guest

    A friend of mine has moved into a flat where there's currently no landline installed, so one is going to be installed soon.

    Looking at the back of the house there's currently only one cable from the pole to one of the lower flats.

    Will OpenReach install another cable from the pole to my friend's flat or might they do some fancy thing where they supply her flat from the existing cable to save themselves work? I'm concerned that would give my friend an inadequate broadband service.

    Also

    I've installed a couple of solid core Cat5 cables going to a double socket in the centre of the flat, one socket is for the phone, one is an RJ45 for the router. Is it standard practice for OpenReach to install a double master socket with filtered faceplate to which I can connect these cables, or doyou have to ask them specifically on the day to do that?
     
    Murmansk, Aug 25, 2015
    #1
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  2. Murmansk

    Dick Guest

    They will run a new cable.
    They will install a filtered faceplate master socket.
     
    Dick, Aug 25, 2015
    #2
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  3. Murmansk

    Kráftéé Guest

    "Dick" wrote in message
    They will run a new cable.
    They will install a filtered faceplate master socket.
    Not any more they don't, it'll be a normal NTE, unless the CP has paid
    for one to be fitted.
     
    Kráftéé, Aug 25, 2015
    #3
  4. If you want a filtered faceplace with two sockets, instead of having
    to plug in an external dangly box, you can buy the kit on Amazon and
    fit it yourself. Search for "interstitial VDSL faceplace". You'll only
    need a screwdriver and it'll take you about 5 minutes.

    Rod.
     
    Roderick Stewart, Aug 26, 2015
    #4
  5. Murmansk

    Woody Guest


    Agreed but look on fleabay.

    You need one with the Openreach marking and version 3 - don't pay more
    than about £8.
     
    Woody, Aug 26, 2015
    #5
  6. Murmansk

    Murmansk Guest

    Hmm, looks like I'll have to buy my own double filtered faceplate then.

    Maybe if we ply the fitter with M&S chocolate biscuits they'll fit one!
     
    Murmansk, Aug 26, 2015
    #6
  7. Murmansk

    Woody Guest

    Worth every penny. The Mk3 has some line-powered electronics in it
    that not only filters the B/B but also rebalances the line usually
    resulting in a quieter line with improved audio, let alone any
    improvements to B/B speeds.
     
    Woody, Aug 26, 2015
    #7
  8. Murmansk

    Graham. Guest

    It's quite rare to see a filtered faceplate fitted as standard on an
    ADSL installation, you are generally expected to use the ISP supplied
    micro-filters. It was standard practice to have a faceplate fitted for
    VDSL but as you imply, standards have slipped badly.

    The OP has not mentioned which technology has been ordered for the
    line.
     
    Graham., Aug 26, 2015
    #8
  9. Murmansk

    Kráftéé Guest

    "Graham." wrote in message

    It's quite rare to see a filtered faceplate fitted as standard on an
    ADSL installation, you are generally expected to use the ISP supplied
    micro-filters. It was standard practice to have a faceplate fitted for
    VDSL but as you imply, standards have slipped badly.

    The OP has not mentioned which technology has been ordered for the
    line.

    Even if it is VDSL the standard (now) is just a basic NTE.

    It's been like this for several months now.

    If the Openreach engineer does the install and then initiate the VDSL
    service, they are supposed to do the fit, leave site (after fitting
    the NTE) and then return to the PCP (which is where he may have been
    working just minutes before) and then run the jumpers to get the VDSL
    working. It's what the CPs want, but it's not what a lot of the end
    users expect.

    Yes the old chocolate biscuit trick may work, but if there is a
    quality inspection afterwards the engineer can be accused of not
    working to the equivalence standards expected, which could be anything
    from a slap wrist upwards.

    Stupid...yes but the engineer has to stick to what the CP is paying
    for and in most cases now that isn't and engineering install of the
    VDSL service.
     
    Kráftéé, Aug 26, 2015
    #9
  10. Murmansk

    Graham J Guest

    [snip]

    Experience from Tuesday 25 August (yesterday)

    Customer moves house within same town (Norwich) - tries to take BT phone
    number with him. Can't take Virgin fibre - not available at new location.

    Three weeks ago BT cancel his move order with no explanation.

    So we order phone line and FTTC from Zen on 4 August. Speed estimate is
    76 Mbits/sec. Phone line is livened up on previous occupier's number on
    7 August.

    FTTC is scheduled for Tuesday AM. Existing extension wiring indicates
    that FTTC was used by previous occupier, but is clearly not done correctly.

    Phil from MJ Quinn on behalf of Openreach arrives mid morning, knowing
    that FTTC is already on line so he fits new NTE and VDSL filter, also
    supples VDSL modem - all exactly as expected. He hopes this will be a
    10 minute job.

    But: his tests show only 46.5 Mbits/sec download, also "potential HR
    joint detected on GEA service". So he goes to cab, finds aluminium
    cable which crumbles in his hand. Re-patches with copper, re-tests at
    cab - speed still slow. Requests lift-and-shift and returns to customer
    to wait for this to complete. On completion speed now 80Mbits/sec - but
    now we have "rectified loop" fault. More testing at customer site and
    at cabinet - can't find cause of this fault. FTTC and phone all work OK
    so he closes the job with fault unresolved.

    Took him 2 hours, for a job which probably paid him £12.

    Properly dedicated, declined all tea and biscuits.

    He knew the cab and area so if you see him you know he is very
    conscientious.
     
    Graham J, Aug 26, 2015
    #10
  11. Murmansk

    Murmansk Guest

    The OP has not mentioned which technology has been ordered for the
    It's just plain old broadband that I think of as ADSL, not fibre or anything fancy. Estimated speed is 8Mbps I think.
     
    Murmansk, Aug 26, 2015
    #11
  12. Murmansk

    Graham. Guest

    Yes.

    FTTC and VDSL equate to the same thing.

    Personally I avoid the marketing team "Fibre Broadband", because ADSL
    also uses fibre optic for the backhaul in the same way.

    The only difference is ADSL has a metallic connection to the exchange
    and FTTC has a shorter length of copper to the roadside cabinet,
    hopefully short enough to benefit from the higher speeds that the VDSL
    modulation allows.
     
    Graham., Aug 30, 2015
    #12
  13. When my line developed a fault last year, the OR engineer upgraded the
    original NTE5+external microfilter master socket to the combined v3 VDSL
    one, despite my only having ADSL.

    My only objection is that the depth of the back box, plus the
    interstitial plate, plus the original faceplate, makes the whole shebang
    stick out from the wall like a sore thumb. Foe reasons best known to
    himself, the original installer had mounted the socket about 1m off the
    floor for good measure. I think "carbuncle" would be too good a word
    for it.

    Going to move it elsewhere when I have a round tuit.
     
    Mike Tomlinson, Aug 31, 2015
    #13
  14. I'm not too happy about BT's gratuitous use of the word "infinity"
    either, but then it's only advertising, so maybe concepts like truth
    and accuracy don't really apply.

    Rod.
     
    Roderick Stewart, Aug 31, 2015
    #14
  15. Murmansk

    Davey Guest

    What I hated was their targeted advertising of 'Infinity' when it wasn't
    even available to me.
    No 'maybe' about it!
     
    Davey, Aug 31, 2015
    #15
  16. Murmansk

    Tim+ Guest


    Have to agree about the bulkiness of it. I've left my standard split
    faceplate master socket and installed the VDSL filtered master socket in
    the cupboard under the stairs where our router lives and have wired the
    house extensions to that one.

    Tim
     
    Tim+, Aug 31, 2015
    #16
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