Password Protecting CD'S

Discussion in 'Home Networking' started by CS, May 11, 2004.

  1. CS

    CS Guest

    Hi does anyone know if there is any software or a way to password protect a
    cd-r and stop the files even once the password has been entered to be copied
    to the hard drive?

    Thanks In Advance

    Carl
     
    CS, May 11, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. CS

    MartinW Guest

    We use BestCrypt containers for this http://www.jetico.com, files can be
    stored in encrypted containers on just about any media CDROM's included
    and are mounted as separate drive letters under Windows.

    The best thing about it is the same containers can also be read on our
    Linux and Unix systems as well.

    Martin
     
    MartinW, May 12, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. CS

    Eric Guest

    How would it work? You would need co-operation from the OS. So if my OS
    ignored its restrictions, I can read your CD.

    However the best way is to make the data unuseable, and so not worth
    copying. For example one big encrypted file on an ISO9660 CD.

    For the data to be useable it must pass through an application to do the
    decryption. This can be a generic app, but that leaves a clear copy of the
    data. You would have to use a library to plug into the back of your app.

    Simple encryption libraries are not too hard to write, but then they are
    quite easy to break. Depends on your budget and data value. Or use libcrypt
    or something like that.


    Eric
     
    Eric, May 12, 2004
    #3
  4. CS

    Depresion Guest

    You could use something like PGP disk but once the files are decrypted they can
    be copied out in clear form.
     
    Depresion, May 12, 2004
    #4
  5. CS

    Rob Morley Guest

    What is going to use the data?
     
    Rob Morley, May 12, 2004
    #5
  6. This may not be the answer to your question, but from personal
    experience I just use password encoded zip files. If I do not want
    people to be able to even see the file list then I place one zip file
    inside the other and use different passwords on each.

    Of course I have no idea how tough it is crack open zip files, but the
    sensitivity of the data I am working with is not high enough to worry
    about that too much, and the people I am preventing from seeing it are
    not remarkably technical either.
     
    Simon Pleasants, May 12, 2004
    #6
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.