NEWS: Cingular claims US first with HSDPA handset

Discussion in 'Wireless Internet' started by John Navas, Jul 18, 2006.

  1. John Navas

    John Navas Guest

    Data-tastic
    <http://www.theregister.com/2006/07/18/cingular_lg_cu500_hspda/>

    Cingular yesterday claimed a US first for its new HSDPA phone, a
    skinny black clamshell from LG, dubbed the CU500.

    Cingular boasts that its new phone breaks the speed barrier, but given
    Joe Public's indifference, nay hostility, to mobile data,
    few people will be aware that there is a speed barrier to break. Still
    customers can always talk faster on their shiny new phones.

    HSDPA is often known as "Super 3G", or "3.5G" - it's up to five times
    faster than vanilla 3G networks. This means that watching video and
    browsing the internet by phone becomes much less of a chore - even if
    the costs are hugely inflated compared with, say, watching video on
    your laptop by Wi-Fi.

    The LG CU500 comes preloaded with AOL, Yahoo! and MSN messenger
    clients, a "full featured" music player - and optional Bluetooth
    stereo headset - and a 1.3 megapixel camera. It is available in 18
    major markets - Cingular expects to roll out its 3G network to most
    major markets by the end of the year. It costs $99 with a two-year
    contract. Choose the most expensive plan and you can get a $50 mail-in
    rebate.

    ...

    [MORE]
     
    John Navas, Jul 18, 2006
    #1
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  2. John Navas

    Eric Cartman Guest

    Cingular can CLAIM and PROMISE the moon!

    And doubt they will deliver on time, the rated speed or even at all.

    Cingular is PRO at worthless public "Fluff". If they follow true to form, it
    will be released 2 years late, in a few major cities and backed up with tons
    of bullshit techno-babble as to why it supposedly works...but doesnt at YOUR
    house...

    Meanwhile..Verizon is here NOW....it works NOW...it's coast to coast NOW...
    NO promises, no Cingular bullshit...
     
    Eric Cartman, Jul 19, 2006
    #2
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  3. John Navas

    Rico Guest

    Problem with LG brand phones is the radio sucks. LG needs to get the main
    function down (a radio that can reach a tower and hear a tower clearly) and
    then start adding gee whiz functions.

    Seems like the phone makers have forgotten the critical function of their
    products, a relaible sensitive radio first everything else second. Motorola
    used to have great radios, then the Razr line came along and the quality of
    the radio fell to average at best.

    Don't understand why the phone companies don't get after the phone makers
    on that issue, a bad radio makes their network seem bad.

    fundamentalism, fundamentally wrong.
     
    Rico, Jul 19, 2006
    #3
  4. John Navas

    Rico Guest

    Verizon only works 'fast' in the major cities (Atlanta, Vegas, Dallas etc)
    it is like a bottom tier DSL in the third tier cities and non-existant in
    small towns. (talking data) No signal at all in Pacolet Mills, SC, but
    oddly my cell phone can find a digital tower to tell me I have voice mail
    etc as well as make and receive voice calls from the Hardees in the center
    of town. Go figure...

    Note people on Cingular ask to borrow my Verizon phone when we are in
    Pacolet Mills -- the town wired phones are you guessed it BellSouth.

    fundamentalism, fundamentally wrong.
     
    Rico, Jul 19, 2006
    #4
  5. John Navas

    SMS Guest

    Having visited Korea many times, (and having rented LG phones because I
    was always there to go to LG), I think the reason for the performance
    issues of their phones is that they design them for areas with a much
    better infrastructure of towers. Europe and Asia have a lot better
    wireless coverage than the U.S., and the radios don't have to be as good
    to "reach a tower."

    I never had a problem with LG CDMA phones in Korea, but in the U.S.
    their phones were never as good as the Motorola CDMA phones.
     
    SMS, Jul 19, 2006
    #5
  6. John Navas

    Rico Guest

    Of course it is easy to have a lot of infrastrure in S Korea, it has a land
    mass less then California... <wink>

    But you do have a point to some degree. I'd like better coverage but admit
    to being two faced about it, I don't really want a lot more eyesores err
    towers on the tops of the ridges in the mountains. Still how hard is it to
    build a better radio, as I said Motorola used to do it.

    fundamentalism, fundamentally wrong.
     
    Rico, Jul 19, 2006
    #6
  7. John Navas

    Guest Guest

    |>Rico wrote:
    |>
    |>> Problem with LG brand phones is the radio sucks. LG needs to get the main
    |>> function down (a radio that can reach a tower and hear a tower clearly) and
    |>> then start adding gee whiz functions.
    |>>
    |>> Seems like the phone makers have forgotten the critical function of their
    |>> products, a relaible sensitive radio first everything else second. Motorola
    |>> used to have great radios, then the Razr line came along and the quality of
    |>> the radio fell to average at best.
    |>>
    |>> Don't understand why the phone companies don't get after the phone makers
    |>> on that issue, a bad radio makes their network seem bad.
    |>
    |>Having visited Korea many times, (and having rented LG phones because I
    |>was always there to go to LG), I think the reason for the performance
    |>issues of their phones is that they design them for areas with a much
    |>better infrastructure of towers. Europe and Asia have a lot better
    |>wireless coverage than the U.S., and the radios don't have to be as good
    |>to "reach a tower."
    |>
    |>I never had a problem with LG CDMA phones in Korea, but in the U.S.
    |>their phones were never as good as the Motorola CDMA phones.
    |
    | Of course it is easy to have a lot of infrastrure in S Korea, it has a land
    | mass less then California... <wink>

    How about having a lot of infrastructure in Rhode Island?

    Of course if it's an issue of making the infrastructure be as large as
    people travel to, you need to also include Las Vegas for Californians.


    | But you do have a point to some degree. I'd like better coverage but admit
    | to being two faced about it, I don't really want a lot more eyesores err
    | towers on the tops of the ridges in the mountains. Still how hard is it to
    | build a better radio, as I said Motorola used to do it.

    But better is totally inconsistent with today's extreme hyper short term
    market growth investment strategies. See where Motorola is today.
     
    Guest, Jul 19, 2006
    #7
  8. It's also comes preloaded CRIPPLED! Got mine yesterday, and today I
    learned that the CU500 (unlike the CU320), will force the user to confirm
    each and every HTTP connection initiated by a Java applet (at least,
    applets not blessed by Cingular). Big deal, you say? Try using google
    maps: http://google.com/gmm. I pay $100/month so Cingular can pull stupid
    stunts like this!? (Literally every connection; not just every
    instantiation of the applet.)

    I've been waiting for this phone for months, now I'm regretting not having
    gone w/ Sprint.
     
    William Ahern, Jul 19, 2006
    #8
  9. John Navas

    Rico Guest

    And they wonder why the public doesn't jump all over these new wireless
    technologies they add to the phones. (answer all monopolies are run by the
    marketing brain dead) Cingular isn't a monoploy he says, well AT&T which
    owns cingular is a monopoly for the local loop in all areas it services.
    Where are the real trust busters when we need them?
    fundamentalism, fundamentally wrong.
     
    Rico, Jul 21, 2006
    #9
  10. AT&T is a monopoly in nothing [OK, you are partly right, the local loop for
    customers without alternatives means they are a local monopoly]. A large
    percentage of customers in AT&T's area can use Cable for phone, broadband or
    Internet. They also have an option to use DBS for TV and Internet [the latter
    being pretty marginal] and they also have the option for using cell phones
    rather than a land line. No, they are not a monopoly.
     
    Thomas T. Veldhouse, Jul 21, 2006
    #10
  11. Yes and Verizon is cancelling people's data accounts at an alarming rate
    for doing things such as streaming video and music and anything else that
    goes against their policy of ONLY using EV-DO to email and surf the web.
    Why people use Verizon as an example compared to Cingular is beyond me.
    Not surprisingly, Verizon is against 3G routers whereas Sprint and
    Cingular actually embrace it and have worked with companies such as
    Junxion and others. I'm using HSDPA and have for a while and there is no
    comparison but if you must use EV-DO, Sprint's policy is that you do not
    run a server with public access over the EV-DO link.


    Dave
     
    David W Studeman, Jul 25, 2006
    #11
  12. John Navas

    John Navas Guest

    Sadly, a few here are so consumed by personal vendettas against Cingular
    that facts don't matter.
    HSDPA is indeed very good.
     
    John Navas, Jul 25, 2006
    #12
  13. John Navas

    John Navas Guest

    Even with regard to the local loop, since ready alternatives exist, and
    since other competitors are free to run their own local loops.
     
    John Navas, Jul 25, 2006
    #13
  14. John Navas

    Rico Guest

    Ever try to call the fire department using your Direct TV box, they'll show
    up in time to save the chimney. There is no choice for the consumer. I know
    you are brain washed into thinking cable = choice, it does not, you are
    just trading one monopoy for another. This is why the fight over net
    neutrality is so critical, because as a consumer you in fact have very few
    to no choices about the wire into your home.

    fundamentalism, fundamentally wrong.
     
    Rico, Jul 27, 2006
    #14
  15. John Navas

    Rico Guest

    I don't know what country you live in John but in the entire USA there are
    three wire options into people's homes, the bell monopoly, the cable
    monopoly and the power monopoly. That is it, no one else is allowed by law
    to play. There ar esome reasonable and pratical reasons for this, but
    nver-the-less that is all the choice a consumer has and actually only two
    of them are even remotely viable. Are you sure you aren't in the direct pay
    of AT&T, I mean you are better then the official spokes person, even they
    admit there are very limited choices.

    fundamentalism, fundamentally wrong.
     
    Rico, Jul 27, 2006
    #15
  16. This is not true at all. I can get a different phone company and they use the
    common carrier to deliver service. I can use DSL services via an ILEC like
    Covad if I like. Futher, there is no monopoly on Phone Service in general as
    I choose a different phone company [as already established], I can choose to
    use a company like Comcast or I can choose to use VoIP or even wireless.

    So, in short, I can get telephone, data and television services from multiple
    sources, so none of the three are local monopolies. The ONLY local monopoly
    is your basic utilities [of which phone is no longer a part]; electricity,
    natural gas [if you get it] and water.

    So, if you have issues with utilities ... including telephone services, you
    can talk to your PUC, but misusing the term monopoly won't get you far these
    days.
     
    Thomas T. Veldhouse, Jul 27, 2006
    #16
  17. John Navas

    Peter Pan Guest

    Note the word "INTO" in the above (there are three wire options into
    people's homes).... Sure you can use others, but there is ONLY one local
    company that can do the end part INTO your home...
     
    Peter Pan, Jul 27, 2006
    #17
  18. John Navas

    John Navas Guest

    As a result of deregulation, there isn't any artificial limitation on
    "INTO" -- companies are free to overbuild even the last mile if they see
    a sufficiently good business opportunity. The problem is that the
    business opportunity isn't sufficiently good, not any monopoly.
     
    John Navas, Jul 27, 2006
    #18
  19. John Navas

    John Navas Guest

     
    John Navas, Jul 28, 2006
    #19
  20. John Navas

    John Navas Guest

    I do. That's the way Java-enabled phones are supposed to act.
    Otherwise customers can get hit with large bills or security issues.
    I do. It's great.
    No, just once for each instantiation.
    Then return it.
     
    John Navas, Jul 28, 2006
    #20
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