network over power lines

Discussion in 'Wireless Internet' started by Scott, Feb 8, 2004.

  1. Scott

    Scott Guest

    I know this is not true "wireless" but I don't have to run wires to use it
    so it's kind of wireless :) I didn't see any other active groups that were
    more appropriate. Feel free to point me to a better place if you can think
    of it.

    Anyone have experience with using powerlines for networking? If I have one
    of those devices in my house for networking over powerlines, how far does it
    go - will my neighbour be able to tap into my network?

    I've noticed a couple of pilot programs pop up in Canada where the power
    company is offering internet access by putting 802.11b access points on the
    power lines running down the street. I assume this means that there is
    something that would block a network signal from a house to the main line.

    - Scott
     
    Scott, Feb 8, 2004
    #1
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  2. Scott

    Duane Arnold Guest

    No -- but can anyone attack your network via the Internet, it's the same as
    any other netwoking situation where a machine on the network has access to
    the Internet.
    The only blocking there would be is if the ISP doesn't allow a MAC not tied
    to one of its accounts to use its network.

    Duane :)
     
    Duane Arnold, Feb 8, 2004
    #2
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  3. Unlikely your neighbors could see the signal. Sounds to me like it
    would be something akin to the X-10 products which don't work beyond
    the transformer that feeds your house.



    Kirk

    "Moe, Larry, the cheese!", Curly

    www.sandpoint.net/captkirk
    www.stormyacres.com
     
    'Captain' Kirk DeHaan, Feb 8, 2004
    #3
  4. Scott

    James Knott Guest

    No, there's no filter or anything. However, there'll be lots of
    interference problems with that system, as have been shown elsewhere. The
    power line system will interfere with licenced radio services and may be
    interfered with by them.

    All in all, a very bad idea.

    --

    Fundamentalism is fundamentally wrong.

    To reply to this message, replace everything to the left of "@" with
    james.knott.
     
    James Knott, Feb 8, 2004
    #4
  5. Scott

    James Knott Guest

    However, neighbours often share a transformer.

    --

    Fundamentalism is fundamentally wrong.

    To reply to this message, replace everything to the left of "@" with
    james.knott.
     
    James Knott, Feb 8, 2004
    #5
  6. Scott

    ken Guest

    A customer of mine didn't want to have CAT5 wiring run in their house
    and had an aversion to wireless (I didn't quite understand their
    concerns, but their opposition to wireless was considerable), so we used
    the Netgear powerline products. They have had a few minor issues
    (occasionally the Netgear unit seems to 'get lost', unplugging the unit
    and plugging it back in solves the problem) but are quite happy with it.

    Have never checked to see if neighbors can see the network.

    ken
     
    ken, Feb 8, 2004
    #6
  7. Scott

    Tom B. Guest

    Tom B., Feb 11, 2004
    #7
  8. Scott

    James Knott Guest

    You forgot to mention the interference potential. Power lines are lousy for
    carrying the frequencies involved and tend to act as antennas.

    --

    Fundamentalism is fundamentally wrong.

    To reply to this message, replace everything to the left of "@" with
    james.knott.
     
    James Knott, Feb 11, 2004
    #8
  9. Scott

    D. Stussy Guest

    ....And the fact that several public safety agencies, not just the amateur radio
    community, has detected interference from BPL and as a result, several
    communities have already banned it. Nothing statewide yet.
     
    D. Stussy, Feb 16, 2004
    #9
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