Need advice on transfering SSL-enabled site from hosting to a localhost

Discussion in 'Linux Networking' started by papakota, Jul 2, 2015.

  1. papakota

    papakota Guest

    Hello!

    I have a web site that has HTTPS. Right now I DO NOT have SSL certificate
    installed on hosting. They charge extra for that. I want to transfer my site
    to a localhost and then to install SSL on Apache myself. So I wonder whether
    I should pay them and have them SSL certificate installed on a hosting
    server and after that to copy to site to a localhost OR to leave it alone as
    it is now and just install SSL on Apache from scratch myself.
    I ALREADY have SSL certificate installed as it was PRIOR to my termination
    of my previous hosting account (when that archive ZIP file was originally
    created). It's already there files-wise, just not installed yet on my new
    (current) hosting server. And though I don't feel like wasting $25 for their
    job to install SSL's (I've got 2, but they charge for a bulk of an extra
    10+1 free that comes with the hosting plan = 11 SSL's alltogether), moneyis
    not a critical point here. What is critical is the EASY path for me to get
    the job done. I'm not a big expert when it comes to system administration
    and Apache. And I'm a complete novice in Linux (I use W7/Ubuntu 14.04
    Desktop edition dual-boot box).


    ---
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    papakota, Jul 2, 2015
    #1
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  2. A certificate is only good for the domain and hostnames it's been set up
    for. While you could generate your own certificate, no browser would trust
    it without the user approving it.

    A certificate generated for one domain or host can not be used on another
    host, without the users getting the warning that the hostname does not
    match the certificate name.

    Regards, Dave Hodgins
     
    David W. Hodgins, Jul 3, 2015
    #2
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  3. papakota

    papakota Guest

    Thanks a lot for your reply!

    I think I might haven't made myself clear enough. The domain the cert is for
    remains THE SAME -- regardless whether it's installed in a hosting
    environment or on my local machine at home. As per hostnames, here I don't
    know what you meant exactly. I think that when a CA issues a certificate,
    you can install it on ANY server (at least, Apache, for sure). The cert is
    not tied to a specific box, right?
    Maximum, I might have to re-issue CSR or whatever it's called, I don't
    remember exactly all the procedures, but it's not that difficult anyhow. As
    per self-signed certificates that you mentioned -- I know what you're saying
    in that regard. It does look scary in a browser, unless you know 100% what
    it's about (like if it belongs to you). DEFINITELY I won't even think to
    show that Freddy Krueger thing to my potential clients! No way, God forbid!



    "David W. Hodgins" Ñообщил(а) в новоÑÑ‚ÑÑ…
    Ñледующее:eek:...

    A certificate is only good for the domain and hostnames it's been set up
    for. While you could generate your own certificate, no browser would trust
    it without the user approving it.

    A certificate generated for one domain or host can not be used on another
    host, without the users getting the warning that the hostname does not
    match the certificate name.

    Regards, Dave Hodgins

    --
    Change nomail.afraid.org to ody.ca to reply by email.
    (nomail.afraid.org has been set up specifically for
    use in usenet. Feel free to use it yourself.)


    ---
    Это Ñообщение проверено на вируÑÑ‹ антивируÑом Avast.
    https://www.avast.com/antivirus


    --- news://freenews.netfront.net/ - complaints: ---
     
    papakota, Jul 3, 2015
    #3
  4. papakota

    papakota Guest

    Thanks a lot for your reply!

    I think I might haven't made myself clear enough. The domain the cert is for
    remains THE SAME -- regardless whether it's installed in a hosting
    environment or on my local machine at home. As per hostnames, here I don't
    know what you meant exactly. I think that when a CA issues a certificate,
    you can install it on ANY server (at least, Apache, for sure). The cert is
    not tied to a specific box, right?
    Maximum, I might have to re-issue CSR or whatever it's called, I don't
    remember exactly all the procedures, but it's not that difficult anyhow. As
    per self-signed certificates that you mentioned -- I know what you're saying
    in that regard. It does look scary in a browser, unless you know 100% what
    it's about (like if it belongs to you). DEFINITELY I won't even think to
    show that Freddy Krueger thing to my potential clients! No way, God forbid!



    "David W. Hodgins" Ñообщил(а) в новоÑÑ‚ÑÑ…
    Ñледующее:eek:...

    A certificate is only good for the domain and hostnames it's been set up
    for. While you could generate your own certificate, no browser would trust
    it without the user approving it.

    A certificate generated for one domain or host can not be used on another
    host, without the users getting the warning that the hostname does not
    match the certificate name.

    Regards, Dave Hodgins

    --
    Change nomail.afraid.org to ody.ca to reply by email.
    (nomail.afraid.org has been set up specifically for
    use in usenet. Feel free to use it yourself.)


    ---
    Это Ñообщение проверено на вируÑÑ‹ антивируÑом Avast.
    https://www.avast.com/antivirus


    --- news://freenews.netfront.net/ - complaints: ---
     
    papakota, Jul 3, 2015
    #4
  5. papakota

    papakota Guest

    Thanks a lot for your reply!

    I think I might haven't made myself clear enough. The domain the cert is for
    remains THE SAME -- regardless whether it's installed in a hosting
    environment or on my local machine at home. As per hostnames, here I don't
    know what you meant exactly. I think that when a CA issues a certificate,
    you can install it on ANY server (at least, Apache, for sure). The cert is
    not tied to a specific box, right?
    Maximum, I might have to re-issue CSR or whatever it's called, I don't
    remember exactly all the procedures, but it's not that difficult anyhow. As
    per self-signed certificates that you mentioned -- I know what you're saying
    in that regard. It does look scary in a browser, unless you know 100% what
    it's about (like if it belongs to you). DEFINITELY I won't even think to
    show that Freddy Krueger thing to my potential clients! No way, God forbid!



    "David W. Hodgins" Ñообщил(а) в новоÑÑ‚ÑÑ…
    Ñледующее:eek:...

    A certificate is only good for the domain and hostnames it's been set up
    for. While you could generate your own certificate, no browser would trust
    it without the user approving it.

    A certificate generated for one domain or host can not be used on another
    host, without the users getting the warning that the hostname does not
    match the certificate name.

    Regards, Dave Hodgins

    --
    Change nomail.afraid.org to ody.ca to reply by email.
    (nomail.afraid.org has been set up specifically for
    use in usenet. Feel free to use it yourself.)


    ---
    Это Ñообщение проверено на вируÑÑ‹ антивируÑом Avast.
    https://www.avast.com/antivirus


    --- news://freenews.netfront.net/ - complaints: ---
     
    papakota, Jul 3, 2015
    #5
  6. papakota

    papakota Guest

    Thanks a lot for your reply!

    I think I might haven't made myself clear enough. The domain the cert is for
    remains THE SAME -- regardless whether it's installed in a hosting
    environment or on my local machine at home. As per hostnames, here I don't
    know what you meant exactly. I think that when a CA issues a certificate,
    you can install it on ANY server (at least, Apache, for sure). The cert is
    not tied to a specific box, right?
    Maximum, I might have to re-issue CSR or whatever it's called, I don't
    remember exactly all the procedures, but it's not that difficult anyhow. As
    per self-signed certificates that you mentioned -- I know what you're saying
    in that regard. It does look scary in a browser, unless you know 100% what
    it's about (like if it belongs to you). DEFINITELY I won't even think to
    show that Freddy Krueger thing to my potential clients! No way, God forbid!

    "papakota" ÓÏÏÂÝÉÌ(Á) × ÎÏ×ÏÓÔÑÈ
    ÓÌÅÄÕÀÝÅÅ:mn2vfl$uuh$...

    Hello!

    I have a web site that has HTTPS. Right now I DO NOT have SSL certificate
    installed on hosting. They charge extra for that. I want to transfer my site
    to a localhost and then to install SSL on Apache myself. So I wonder whether
    I should pay them and have them SSL certificate installed on a hosting
    server and after that to copy to site to a localhost OR to leave it alone as
    it is now and just install SSL on Apache from scratch myself.
    I ALREADY have SSL certificate installed as it was PRIOR to my termination
    of my previous hosting account (when that archive ZIP file was originally
    created). It's already there files-wise, just not installed yet on my new
    (current) hosting server. And though I don't feel like wasting $25 for their
    job to install SSL's (I've got 2, but they charge for a bulk of an extra
    10+1 free that comes with the hosting plan = 11 SSL's alltogether), money is
    not a critical point here. What is critical is the EASY path for me to get
    the job done. I'm not a big expert when it comes to system administration
    and Apache. And I'm a complete novice in Linux (I use W7/Ubuntu 14.04
    Desktop edition dual-boot box).


    ---
    üÔÏ ÓÏÏÂÝÅÎÉÅ ÐÒÏ×ÅÒÅÎÏ ÎÁ ×ÉÒÕÓÙ ÁÎÔÉ×ÉÒÕÓÏÍ Avast.
    https://www.avast.com/antivirus


    --- news://freenews.netfront.net/ - complaints: ---


    ---
    üÔÏ ÓÏÏÂÝÅÎÉÅ ÐÒÏ×ÅÒÅÎÏ ÎÁ ×ÉÒÕÓÙ ÁÎÔÉ×ÉÒÕÓÏÍ Avast.
    https://www.avast.com/antivirus


    --- news://freenews.netfront.net/ - complaints: ---
     
    papakota, Jul 3, 2015
    #6
  7. Correct, as long as you have control over the dns records for the domain
    name.

    Regards, Dave Hodgins
     
    David W. Hodgins, Jul 3, 2015
    #7
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