Linksys WRT1900AN and Open WRT (x-post)

Discussion in 'Network Routers' started by Steve Woodall, May 11, 2014.

  1. I've just got my WRT1900AN running as of yesterday, replacing a Buffalo
    unit from a decade before. I know it is more than I need, but I hope it will
    last for years and handle what ever may come down the wireless pike.

    First off, I was mildly disappointed that a linux version of the
    install/admin app was not available out of the box, nor did one appear
    online. I'm weaning myself off MS, turning to LinuxMint for my first go
    around with that OS. If I were more familiar with Linux, I might have tried
    harder and worked the install via command line. Maybe later. I do foresee
    turning the admin duties over to Linux in the future.

    The Smart Wi-Fi app leaves something to be desired, which was the other
    reason I spent for the leading edge of consumer grade routers. I read and
    understand Open WRT is (or will be) an option in firmware for this device. I
    don't get a lot of the particulars about that program, generally seeing the
    same screenshots and reading some raves about how granular the control of
    specific devices, events, and implementations can be. I'm just looking for a
    more in-depth or 1st person review, before I try flashing the unit and
    hopefully not coming away with a brick. A list of potential 'gotcha's' to be
    aware of would really go a long way for me.

    TIA
    Steve
     
    Steve Woodall, May 11, 2014
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Steve Woodall

    simple Guest

    I've just got my WRT1900AN ...
    Why would you need an install/admin app? Just use the web interface or
    telnet/ssh into it if that's an option. Most of these consumer router
    devices are OS-independent; probably the only reason to need MS Windows
    would be if they didn't have a way to upgrade the firmware in the web
    interface (most do and most support tftp as well).
     
    simple, May 18, 2014
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. I was not sure (or aware) of what the specific device might bring with it to
    an OS. Having depended on what was installed originally for the Buffalo Air
    Station, some parts of the Win OS networking were brought up to speed with
    Buffalo's installation way back when. Getting into the nitty-gritty of
    network protocols was not something I was willing to keep up with, and I let
    the updates take care of themselves.

    Now that I will move across to Linux, There are a thousand new apps,
    protocols, and such to learn, or at least get exposed to. Sometimes, those
    apps are dialect specific (Mint, Debian...), others go to a very generic
    heart of the OS. I was just looking for a guide to the path I should follow
    until I am able to find my way around networking and the interaction with
    the specific device.



    Steve

    wrote in message
    Why would you need an install/admin app? Just use the web interface or
    telnet/ssh into it if that's an option. Most of these consumer router
    devices are OS-independent; probably the only reason to need MS Windows
    would be if they didn't have a way to upgrade the firmware in the web
    interface (most do and most support tftp as well).
     
    Steve Woodall, May 23, 2014
    #3
  4. Thanks for the reply.
    Truth is, moving over (slowly) to Linux and trying to set up the whole house
    and guest networks can be a little cloudy, given the manner WinOS programs
    would install. Getting a clear picture of what is device specific and what
    is generic networking protocols was the guidance I was looking for. Being
    able to control both environments for now and what the future might bring
    will be my immediate goal. Linux has a large number of programs that I have
    not been exposed to; I may overlook one that is 'just the thing' due to
    ignorance or simply not recognizing the roll that program might play.

    WRT seemed to be the latest & greatest available, and there is much to learn
    about it. DD- or Open- makes no case that one is superior to other, aside
    from their support and easily understood documentation (man).

    It's a long weekend so I may have time to dive into this deeper.



    Steve

    "Edmund" wrote in message
    Hi
    Sorry to ask -I hate this kind of replies myself- but WHY do you want
    WRT or something on your new router?
    I have installed WRT on 2 routers myself (long time ago) because I needed
    a "Client" mode which wasn't available with the linksys or buffalo
    firmware. Both routers still working fine but I was like you very worried
    about bricking those routers, luckily for me it went fine with both of
    them.
    Don't know what you mean by "install/admin app" under linux.
    Cant you do anything you want via the web interface or do I misunderstand
    you completely?
    BTW I find the -dd wrt- info like anything that involves "linux" a bit
    messy and important info is sometimes hard to find.
    Here is such info that at least I couldn't even find:
    http://www.dd-wrt.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=51486

    Apart from WRT and IF you need it, Tomato ( whats in a name ) is worth a
    look too. It seems a bit better organized then WRT but I haven't tried
    it yet. Both wrt and tomato have as far as I can see similar options and
    a few of such options are very handy if you need it. Giving higher output
    power can be useful and for me, the client mode.

    Edmund
     
    Steve Woodall, May 23, 2014
    #4
  5. Yes, that was the earlier Buffalo's method of operation, administration and
    control.
    I'm now controlling the Linksys from either desktop computer (win or mint).
    I did inflict one added command control. My very minor testing says the mod
    I added is working. Someday when (if) I'm more fluent in network protocols,
    I'll stress test the mod with more muscle.

    Steve

    "David.WE.Roberts" wrote in message

    Did your previous router not have a proper web server, but had
    configuration via a Windows app?
    (Presumably automating the Command Line Interface.)

    If so, and I vaguely remember such beasts (802.11b springs to mind), then
    the last few years the hardware has been able to run a web server so you
    no longer require a dedicated configuration program.

    All configuration is via web browser and so Linux can handle that O.K.

    Cheers

    Dave R
     
    Steve Woodall, Jul 22, 2014
    #5
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.