Linksys BEFW11S4 and DHCP and DNS

Discussion in 'Wireless Internet' started by Stefan Monnier, Nov 17, 2003.

  1. I have two machines connected to a BEFW11S4 router:
    - a Windows XP machine via wireless.
    - a Mac OS C via good old copper wires.
    Both currently use DHCP.

    I noticed the other day that on the PC, the DHCP data says something
    like "use 192.168.1.101, router is 192.168.1.1, DNS is 192.168.1.1".

    I tried to set my Mac box manually to such settings but the DNS part
    does not work. As the doc told me I need to put the IP of my ISP's
    DNS server instead.

    Why do I care?
    1 - The outgoing log on the router gives me IP numbers for connections
    from the Mac but DNS names for connections from the PC. I'd like
    to also get DNS names for the connections coming from the Mac.
    2 - I'd like to use static IP address for my Mac.
    Ideally I'd do that by configuring the DHCP server on the router
    to always hand out the same IP to the same machine, but it seems
    that BEFW11S4 does not support that (I should have checked before
    buying: I was just too naive).
    But if I have to configure the static IP addresses directly on
    the machines, I'd like at least not to have to give IP addresses
    that are prone to change such as my ISP's DNS server. Using
    192.168.1.1 for the DNS server would be much better.

    Does anybody know what's going on and how I can solve the above
    problem(s) ?


    Stefan
     
    Stefan Monnier, Nov 17, 2003
    #1
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  2. Stefan Monnier

    dold Guest

    I think you've quoted those number incorrectly.
    The router wouldn't appear at both .1 and .101.
    This looks like you may have had Windows ICS set up before you installed
    the router.
     
    dold, Nov 17, 2003
    #2
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  3. I noticed the other day that on the PC, the DHCP data says something
    No, the .101 is the machine's IP number dynamically handed out by the
    router, of course. It's sometimes .100, sometimes .102, you know what
    I mean.


    Stefan
     
    Stefan Monnier, Nov 17, 2003
    #3
  4. Use 192.168.1.1 if the router forwards the DNS requests to your ISP - your
    DSL/Cable modem will get its Public IP / DNS and Gateway settings
    automatically unless you have a static IP based Internet Connection.
     
    Nick Le Lievre, Nov 17, 2003
    #4
  5. Stefan Monnier

    dold Guest

    I'm sorry, I misread the original poster's comment, due to some nonstandard
    labels.

    My SMC router shows itself as the DNS server.

    My Linksys BEFW11S4 shows the DNS server of the ISP.
    This is with no changes at all from factory default on the Linksys.

    Ethernet adapter Orinoco:

    Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    Description . . . . . . . . . . . : ORiNOCO PC Card (5 volt)
    Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-02-2D-A8-99-99
    DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
    Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
    IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.100
    Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
    Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
    DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
    DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 206.13.28.12
    206.13.29.12
    Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Wednesday, July 16, 2003
    9:14:38 PM
     
    dold, Nov 17, 2003
    #5
  6. My Linksys BEFW11S4 shows the DNS server of the ISP.
    In the outgoing logs of your BEFW11S4, do you see IP addresses or
    DNS hostnames ?


    Stefan
     
    Stefan Monnier, Nov 17, 2003
    #6
  7. I noticed the other day that on the PC, the DHCP data says something
    As mentioned in the text you quted, I did try those settings
    (i.e. 192.168.1.1 as DNS server) on the Mac but it did not work.
    Anybody knows how the linksys thingy works ? Do they only redirect DNS
    requests for hosts that are served via DHCP ? Or is it a wireless/wire
    difference ? Or a Windows/Mac difference ?

    I guess I'll have to try tcpdump or somesuch to see more of what's going on.


    Stefan
     
    Stefan Monnier, Nov 17, 2003
    #7
  8. Stefan Monnier

    dold Guest

    Using tcpdump for a simple setup seems a little unnecessary.

    I'm not at my Linksys-connected system now, and I've never looked at the
    logs. We have a couple of WinXP systems and a couple of Win2000 systems,
    some wired, some wireless. They all have the default Windows DHCP setups
    and the Linksys is straight-from-the-box with the exception of the DSL
    PPPoE login information.

    A friend of mine has an OS-X laptop connected wired/wireless to his router,
    and I think he's using DHCP. I know he uses DHCP at work. He's never
    mentioned a problem with the connection.

    Why can't your MAC use DHCP?
     
    dold, Nov 17, 2003
    #8
  9. Why can't your MAC use DHCP?

    The DHCP setup works fine, but I need a static IP (I'd love to deliver it
    via DHCP, as long as it is static) because it's a server for the other boxes
    and they need to refer to it via a DNS name or an IP number.


    Stefan
     
    Stefan Monnier, Nov 17, 2003
    #9
  10. Stefan Monnier

    John Guest

    Try setting a static IP with the gateway as your router's IP and using the
    DNS server(s) from your ISP. You'll need to contact your ISP for those
    addresses or get them from the "Status" screen of the Linksys router. Unless
    you use the Get IP Automatically, you'll need to add the DNS IP's yourself.
     
    John, Nov 17, 2003
    #10
  11. Stefan Monnier

    dold Guest

    What I have done on my SMC is to set the lease time to unlimited so
    that once a machine aquires an IP address, it keeps it. That option
    isn't available on the Linksys. So for interface with the Linksys, I
    would set the Mac for DHCP, and verify that it is all working, and note
    those values. Put them into a Mac static setup, and it should be fine.
    You should change the IP address to be outside the range supplied by
    the Linksys, but even that shouldn't be necessary, as long as the Mac
    is usually turned on.
     
    dold, Nov 17, 2003
    #11
  12. Try setting a static IP with the gateway as your router's IP and using the
    In the message you quoted I said:

    But if I have to configure the static IP addresses directly on
    the machines, I'd like at least not to have to give IP addresses
    that are prone to change such as my ISP's DNS server. Using
    192.168.1.1 for the DNS server would be much better.

    so obviously, what I want is to not have to do that. After all my PC with
    DHCP seems to be content with a DNS setting of 192.168.1.1.
    I'm perfectly willing to write 192.168.1.1 manually, but I do not want to
    write my ISP's DNS IP number(s) since those can change at any time.

    Also if I use my ISP's DNS server, the outgoing log on the router does not
    keep track of DNS names but only of IP numbers which are more difficult
    to interpret.


    Stefan
     
    Stefan Monnier, Nov 17, 2003
    #12
  13. Stefan Monnier

    dold Guest

    As I noted, my Linksys DHCP clients do get the IP address of the ISP, where
    the SMC seems to supply itself as the DNS.

    If the Mac is set up as a DHCP client, what DNS address does it use?
    I don't expect any difference in the DHCP client's use of the DNS address
    once it's established, and the staticly addressed system's use of that
    same address.

    I would gladly put in the IP address of the ISP DNS servers. I don't
    expect them to change very often, if ever. The addresses at my ISP have
    remained the same for several years.

    I suspect that ns2.attbi.com is a pretty stable IP address. This is what
    I pick up via dns on MCHSI cable internet.
     
    dold, Nov 17, 2003
    #13
  14. As I noted, my Linksys DHCP clients do get the IP address of the ISP, where
    Yes, I haven't checked that yet.
    But the ISP might change more often and I don't want to have to change every
    computer's config every time I switch ISP.

    In any case what I really want is to hand out static IP addresses via DHCP.
    Does anybody know of routers that can do that (I assumed they'd all do it,
    but I was obviously deluded since mine doesn't).


    Stefan
     
    Stefan Monnier, Nov 17, 2003
    #14
  15. Stefan Monnier

    dold Guest

    ;-) I've been with the same ISP since 1993.
    And that doesn't even matter. You could set your DNS server to almost any
    DNS on the internet, and leave it there regardless of who you use for
    connectivity. 206.13.28.12 ought to be up to the task.
    The SMC routers provide a DHCP lease time of "Forever" as an option.
    I assume that if I get a DHCP address from that, it will remain unchanged
    for a while. I think it actually starts over again if I load new firmware,
    or reset to factory defaults, but if I fetch a DHCP address, I should get
    the one I request, which should be my previous one.

    The Linksys doesn't have that same option. It does have a lease time in
    minutes, which, if high enough, should suffice. The default of "0" is one
    day. That also should be sufficient if the Mac is on at least once a day.
    It does mention "servers that need static addresses" in the glossary,
    but no mention of how to accomplish that.
     
    dold, Nov 18, 2003
    #15
  16. The Linksys doesn't have that same option. It does have a lease time in
    Well, they explain how to do it, which is to just set everything up manually
    on the server (not on the router): set up the IP, the router, the DNS.
    The only way in which the router can be said to support this is because it
    limits its DHCP server to only use a subset of the 254 addresses:
    nothing to brag home about.

    Anyway, thanks for all your help,


    Stefan
     
    Stefan Monnier, Nov 18, 2003
    #16
  17. Stefan Monnier

    dold Guest

    Some routers offer MAC authentication to control wireless connections,
    but they don't seem to extend that to assign a specific IP address, and
    most of the "MAC filters" only apply to wireless, not wired MACs.

    Some routers offer a table of MAC->IP addresses, but I don't know of
    wireless routers that offer that.
     
    dold, Nov 18, 2003
    #17
  18. The Linksys DHCP server only provides addresses to client PCs between
    192.168.1.100 and 192.168.1.150. If you want to assign a static IP address
    to your server, use anything outside of this range that isn't used by
    another device on your network.

    Mike Schumann
     
    Mike Schumann, Nov 18, 2003
    #18
  19. Stefan Monnier

    John Guest

    How about this approach: Get your IP automatically from the Linksys DHCP.
    That will get you auto DSN server you want. Then set the lease for your IP
    to last as long as you can, possibly 99 years. That will "fix" your IP for
    that length of time.
     
    John, Nov 18, 2003
    #19
  20. That may be the default but it's not a built in limitation. My
    Linksys can provide DHCP to addresses in this range:

    192.168.xxx.2 through 192.169.xxx.254
     
    Kevin Davis³, Nov 19, 2003
    #20
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