"Lease obtained; lease expires" - can someone explain these?

Discussion in 'Broadband' started by hungerdunger, Jan 18, 2008.

  1. hungerdunger

    hungerdunger Guest

    In my Wireless Connections Status window there are various details such as
    the computer's physical and IP addresses and also "Lease obtained [date and
    time]" and "Lease expires [date and time]".

    The first appears to be the time I booted up the PC and the second is three
    days after the first.

    I've never noticed these until today when I was round at a friend's father's
    house. He showed me these details on his PC, and he insisted that if he
    didn't renew the lease before its expiry he would have to go through a
    "rigmarole" to get it going again. He was also rather vague about how he
    renewed it, but as he's well into his eighties, I think that's pretty
    understandable*. I'm also pretty sure that his expiry date was only 24
    hours after the obtained date.

    Could someone spare a couple of minutes either to point me to a good web
    site or to explain to me how leases work; why mine appear to renew
    automatically; why it seems he has to physically renew his lease every day
    or risk losing the connection; and whether he can fix this problem.

    *I THINK he told me he goes to "View available networks"; makes a change in
    the settings; then undoes the change and this renews the lease. But I'm not
    100% certain.

    TIA
     
    hungerdunger, Jan 18, 2008
    #1
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  2. hungerdunger

    Graham. Guest


    Do a Goggle for DHCP
    When your PC connects to your router, the router assigned
    an IP address on your LAN from a range or "scope" of
    addresses it has available. For reasons probably concerned
    with larger networks than your LAN this assignment is
    not permanent and needs to be renewed from time to time
    hence the concept of a "lease".
     
    Graham., Jan 18, 2008
    #2
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  3. hungerdunger

    GS Guest

    In a typical Windows network the DHCP client will request a renewal before
    the end of the lease (half way throguh, I think). You can force a renewal
    using the command "ipconfig /renew". It shouldn't ever be necessary.

    GS
     
    GS, Jan 18, 2008
    #3
  4. hungerdunger

    ato_zee Guest

    Or if it is only a small number of, or only one PC, you can turn
    it off and use static addressing. Google for it.
    One advantage of static addressing is with wireless
    connections, where if the connection is towards the
    limits of its range, not having to re-negociate a lease
    can make the connection more reliable.
    But if you don't know much about PC config,
    stick with DHCP unless you have connection problems.
     
    ato_zee, Jan 18, 2008
    #4
  5. hungerdunger

    hungerdunger Guest

    Thanks for that suggestion, which sould be easier than what he does at
    present, but can you suggest why he may be having these problems in the
    first place? (Assuming he really does have a problem). Could there be some
    settings (TCP/IP?) which need adjusting?
     
    hungerdunger, Jan 18, 2008
    #5
  6. I can't think of any reason why he would. MNaybe at sometime he had a
    connection problem and some support dude talked him through this, and
    now he thinks he has to do it every day. I _never_ renew my lease manually.

    (Assuming he really does have a problem). Could there be some
    If he _really_ has to do this every day, you should be adjusting his ISP...
     
    Mark McIntyre, Jan 19, 2008
    #6
  7. hungerdunger

    kraftee Guest

    How would changing his ISP affect a possible problem on the internal
    LAN?
     
    kraftee, Jan 19, 2008
    #7
  8. hungerdunger

    Ivor Jones Guest

    x

    : : : In a typical Windows network the DHCP client will
    : : : request a renewal before
    : : :
    : : : the end of the lease (half way throguh, I think). You
    : : : can force a renewal using the command "ipconfig
    : : : /renew".
    : :
    : : Or if it is only a small number of, or only one PC, you
    : : can turn it off and use static addressing. Google for
    : : it.
    : : One advantage of static addressing is with wireless
    : : connections, where if the connection is towards the
    : : limits of its range, not having to re-negociate a lease
    : : can make the connection more reliable.
    : : But if you don't know much about PC config,
    : : stick with DHCP unless you have connection problems.

    The problem with static addressing on a laptop is when you want to use it
    out and about on a commercial wireless network, which will be using DHCP.
    Your statically addressed laptop will never see the network to log on.

    Ivor
     
    Ivor Jones, Jan 19, 2008
    #8
  9. hungerdunger

    James Egan Guest

    With winxp or vista you have the option of using control software
    which comes with your wireless adaptor or letting windows handle the
    wireless networking. Since you weren't specific about which control
    utility is being used there can be no set answer to this question.

    For sure, if windows (wireless zero configuration) is being used there
    should be no problem with renewing dhcp leases automatically so if
    other control software is currently in use, disable it and enable the
    built in wireless zero configuration.

    Older operating systems than winxp won't have built in wireless
    support so the utility accompanying the network adaptor must be used.
    If this is the case you need to post more details.


    Jim.
     
    James Egan, Jan 19, 2008
    #9
  10. hungerdunger

    Bob Eager Guest

    That's easily solved by setting the DHCP server locally to issue a very
    long lease of the static address, tied to the MAC address of the laptop.
    When theb laptop is used elsewhere, it just picks up whatever is
    available, but reverts to the static address back home.
     
    Bob Eager, Jan 19, 2008
    #10
  11. hungerdunger

    alexd Guest

    He said he uses 'view available networks'. I've never had this work
    without Wireless Zero Config on.
     
    alexd, Jan 19, 2008
    #11
  12. hungerdunger

    Dave Saville Guest

    Sorry, bad advice. There are a *lot* of WIFI cards out there that
    specifically state NOT to use the built in win drivers and especially
    on XP. They say install the driver *before* plugging the card in - so
    win does not see it as new and install it's own. Causes all sorts of
    problems.
     
    Dave Saville, Jan 19, 2008
    #12
  13. hungerdunger

    PeeGee Guest

    Everyone seems to be assuming it is a router/modem and not <shudder>a
    USB modem</shudder>.

    --
    PeeGee

    The reply address is a spam trap. All mail is reported as spam.
    "Nothing should be able to load itself onto a computer without the
    knowledge or consent of the computer user. Software should also be able
    to be removed from a computer easily."
    Peter Cullen, Microsoft Chief Privacy Strategist (Computing 18 Aug 05)
     
    PeeGee, Jan 19, 2008
    #13
  14. hungerdunger

    PeeGee Guest

    There are a number of assumptions which are being made by respondents -
    it would help if you confirmed some details.

    You use wireless, does your friend's father or is he connected by wired
    connection? Does he use an analogue modem, usb modem, router/modem or
    router + cable modem?

    Which OS? XP, for example, allows you to set DHCP with a "fall back"
    static address if no DHCP service is available.

    I have seen problems with obtaining an address from a DHCP server when
    connected via a wireless access point. IIRC, the solution was to
    un-install (or, at least, disable) the proprietary control software (not
    the drivers) and use Windows Zero Configuration. In some cases, it
    required a few reboots and deleting the reference from the list of
    available networks.

    --
    PeeGee

    The reply address is a spam trap. All mail is reported as spam.
    "Nothing should be able to load itself onto a computer without the
    knowledge or consent of the computer user. Software should also be able
    to be removed from a computer easily."
    Peter Cullen, Microsoft Chief Privacy Strategist (Computing 18 Aug 05)
     
    PeeGee, Jan 19, 2008
    #14
  15. hungerdunger

    James Egan Guest

    Who knows what terminology is used by third party software?


    Jim.
     
    James Egan, Jan 19, 2008
    #15
  16. hungerdunger

    James Egan Guest

    It's not bad advice. Windows zero configuration works fine.

    The reason an installation cd might say that isn't because wireless
    zero is crap but to avoid a potential conflict since windows will
    assume that it is going to be running the device and not ask the
    question. It's fairly straightforward to resolve that issue if it
    occurs.

    I have tried running various types of custom software on various makes
    of wi-fi card and some of them are quite complicated when compared to
    the built in windows functionality.



    Jim.
     
    James Egan, Jan 19, 2008
    #16
  17. hungerdunger

    Graham. Guest


    Even if he was, the first sentence of the OPs post tells us
    that a wireless AP, or at least an ad-hoc network with ICS is in use,
    therefore there must be a LAN.
     
    Graham., Jan 19, 2008
    #17
  18. Maybe on his router.

    Mine is set to 72 hour timeout.

    In practice nothing happens -I get the same IP address back without
    knowing it.

    I don't do wireless, but I would expect tnh lease to be renewed
    automagically. Just like Ethernet.


    I suspect he once had a problem, and thinks its to do with that. It
    shouldn;t be.

    On my XP setup, I can see the lease expiry time, but not effect a renewal.
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Jan 19, 2008
    #18
  19. Well he did say wirelss, which lets out USB...;-)
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Jan 19, 2008
    #19
  20. hungerdunger

    PeeGee Guest

    The OP uses wireless; the other system is undefined other than as a PC
    and not as a Laptop. I will acknowledge that "I THINK he told me he goes
    to "View available networks"" could imply a wireless network. However,
    this data is also available for a wired network from the icon in the
    notification area.

    --
    PeeGee

    The reply address is a spam trap. All mail is reported as spam.
    "Nothing should be able to load itself onto a computer without the
    knowledge or consent of the computer user. Software should also be able
    to be removed from a computer easily."
    Peter Cullen, Microsoft Chief Privacy Strategist (Computing 18 Aug 05)
     
    PeeGee, Jan 19, 2008
    #20
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