Is there any other way to get a DIFFERENT IP address than publicvpn servers?

Discussion in 'Linux Networking' started by Joe Domack, Feb 16, 2015.

  1. Joe Domack

    Joe Domack Guest

    My IP address is static, and has been for the past five years.

    I just want a rotating IP address so that all the web sites I visit,
    and all the NNTP servers I use, and all the SMTP/POP/IMAP servers I
    I use, and all the FTP servers I upload or download from, and
    all the P2P clients I download or upload from, etc., wouldn't all
    have the same IP address to correlate all these actions to.

    Of course, I could *change ISPs daily* (if that were feasible),
    but my ISP choices are severely limited so, it's not a feasible
    option to change ISPs (like the NetZero free ISP used to do).

    But, I'm NOT a Linux guru; so maybe there is a way???

    To that end, I ask the basic question:

    Is there any other way to get a different IP address (at least
    daily or weekly) other than to use a series of public VPN servers?
     
    Joe Domack, Feb 16, 2015
    #1
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  2. Joe Domack

    Big_Al Guest

    Joe Domack wrote on 2/15/2015 8:18 PM:
    You're going to VPN into another machine so you can connect out to the internet just to change IPs?
    That sounds a bit harsh.

    Who is your ISP? I'm surprised that any ISP gives you a static IP. Verizon and Comcast around here don't. You have
    to pay to get static here.
     
    Big_Al, Feb 16, 2015
    #2
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  3. Turn off your internet connection devices for a day and see.
    Might want to reset them, too.
     
    Paul in Houston TX, Feb 16, 2015
    #3
  4. Joe Domack

    Jasen Betts Guest

    Nothing has changed in the last six weeks

    the answer is the smae, and the cross-post is not appreciated.
     
    Jasen Betts, Feb 16, 2015
    #4
  5. Time Warner's RoadRunner gives subscribers static IP addresses. I tried
    all sorts of way to change my IP address, but none of them worked. Time
    Warner was somewhat uncooperative, so a gave up the attempt.

    Then, I went away for four days, during which I turned off the surge
    suppressor for my PC, monitor, and printer and disconnected (no off
    switch) the surge suppressor for my router and cable modem. When I
    returned and restored power to my system, lo and behold I had a new IP
    address.

    --
    David E. Ross

    The Crimea is Putin's Sudetenland.
    The Ukraine will be Putin's Czechoslovakia.
    See <http://www.rossde.com/editorials/edtl_PutinUkraine.html>.
     
    David E. Ross, Feb 16, 2015
    #5
  6. When I had Roadrunner, years ago, it had dynamic addressing.
    On a dynamic system an available address will be assigned to
    first come, first serve.
    So if your address is no longer used by you it will be reassigned.
    I don't know what the time lag is... maybe a day or so for the
    isp to determine that your old address is available.
     
    Paul in Houston TX, Feb 16, 2015
    #6
  7. Short answer is no. Medium is -- well if your isp does dhcp and really
    switches your IP (many do not) then maybe but of course that would all
    have your ISPs address, and your ISPs records would be able to connect
    them to you. And your ISP could also connect your going to the public
    VPN site. (Of course since you seem to be developing a full blown case
    of paranoia, how do you know that those public VPN sites are not run by
    the CIA/FBI/NSA/KGB/CISIS/GHCQ/.... and they can watch all of your
    traffic going by.

    Remember the purposes of addresses is to get packets to you.
    The best way to stay secret is to stop "all the web sites I visit,
    and all the NNTP servers I use, and all the SMTP/POP/IMAP servers I
    I use, and all the FTP servers I upload or download from, and
    all the P2P clients I download or upload from, etc.,"
     
    William Unruh, Feb 16, 2015
    #7
  8. Joe Domack

    Joe Domack Guest

    Mine does.
    It's a small operation.
    I'm in the boonies.
    No cable. No DSL. Just WISP or satellite.
     
    Joe Domack, Feb 16, 2015
    #8
  9. Joe Domack

    Joe Domack Guest

    This is a WISP setup. My rooftop radio is equivalent to your modem.

    I don't know if you can log into your modem to see the settings, but,
    I can log into the radio on the roof, and I can easily see that the IP
    address is hard coded.

    I might be able to change it, but, that would screw around with my
    WISP so that's not a viable option.

    That's why I use a public vpn server to change my IP address.
     
    Joe Domack, Feb 16, 2015
    #9
  10. Joe Domack

    Joe Domack Guest

    I could shut off the electricity to my home for a year and I'd
    still have the same public IP address when I booted back up
    simply because it's saved into the settings of the WISP transceiver
    on the roof.

    Each homeowner gets their own IP address. That's how they do it
    here in the boonies, where there is no cable nor DSL.

    So, any talk of leases and dynamic IP addresses won't apply to
    this thread.

    I have to find another way to change my IP address.
     
    Joe Domack, Feb 16, 2015
    #10
  11. Joe Domack

    Joe Domack Guest

    Look. In another home, in another county, I had both DSL and
    cable and I know what you're talking about. The lease is a day
    or two or three on those things. Sometimes the lease is five
    minutes. I know all about that.

    But, out here in the boonies, we have WISP. Our WISP gives every
    home its own IP address. It's the way it is. Each and every
    rooftop transceiver (equivalent, in theory, to your modem), has
    the IP address he has assigned to it, encoded into the setup.

    I know this. I can see this since I can log into the radio
    myself and see it. It isn't going to change if I shut the power
    down for fifty years.

    Of course, I could log into the radio and change it, but that
    has two problems. One, it will not be taken lightly by my WISP,
    and, two, there are only so many I can choose from, since the
    WISP bought a block of addresses, and I'd have to guess which
    he bought (or ask him).

    A public vpn server is easier, or, if you know of another way
    to change a static IP address for all ports, let me know.
     
    Joe Domack, Feb 16, 2015
    #11
  12. Joe Domack

    Joe Domack Guest

    I'm surprised that I came up with the only viable answer, on my own,
    as you guys know far more about networking than I do.

    But, if using a public vpn server is the *only* way to change the
    IP address (short of making a deal with the WISP to constantly change
    it for me, which is really not going to happen), then, that's what it
    is.

    I'm just surprised that I came up with the only viable answer,
    since there almost always is a better way than the way that first
    comes to mind.
     
    Joe Domack, Feb 16, 2015
    #12
  13. It would have been good to state WISP from the beginning.
    The ip address cannot be changed by you.
     
    Paul in Houston TX, Feb 16, 2015
    #13
  14. Joe Domack

    Joe Domack Guest

    I apologize as I thought it was obvious when, in my first sentence
    when I said clearly that the IP address was static and that it
    hadn't changed in five years.

    Heck, we've had power outages out here lasting days on end, and,
    if it was as easy to change the IP address as powering down the
    equipment for a day or two, I'd be ecstatic.

    But, as I said in the very first sentence. My public IP address
    is static. It isn't going to change unless I change it somehow.

    Here's a picture of my radio on the lower left pointing
    through the trees five miles away to the WISP transceiver.

    You guys with cable and DSL are lucky in that you don't have
    to learn how to get your WiFi from miles away over the air
    via line of sight or way up in the sky via satellite.
    http://i58.tinypic.com/ea1lph.jpg

    I'm just surprised that I came up with the only viable method
    of changing the IP address. Surely there must be other ways.
     
    Joe Domack, Feb 16, 2015
    #14
  15. Joe Domack

    Mike Barnes Guest

    FWIW I've had two ISPs in my lifetime and they've both given me fixed
    (and I mean FIXED: notified to me in writing at the time I opened the
    account) IP addresses. No choice. No charge.
     
    Mike Barnes, Feb 16, 2015
    #15
  16. Joe Domack

    Joe Domack Guest

    Same with me. It's no choice. No charge.
    If I want to change the IP address, I can choose a different ISP, or,
    figure out a way.
     
    Joe Domack, Feb 16, 2015
    #16
  17. Joe Domack

    Joe Domack Guest

    I'm not gonna disagree with you that the best way to stay secret
    is to turn off the computer, and rip down my WISP WiFi antenna.
    http://i58.tinypic.com/ea1lph.jpg

    But, there must be a more graceful way to change IP addresses
    than to have to choose from a half dozen or more public VPN
    services.

    One way I know of, but it's immoral, is to glom off any of my
    neighbors who don't use high encryption on their home broadband
    routers, but that's not something I would ever do.

    Likewise, I can travel to a coffeeshop or library, which works,
    but, that's a bit of effort for privacy (and it has its own
    inherencies to it, such as the inevitable cameras and the
    fact you're now doing something in a public place, so you're
    even less protected than you were at home).

    Since our WiFi radios can connect at 2.4 GHz or 5 GHz with
    radios 15 miles away, I could also aim my dish at an unsuspecting
    transceiver but, even if I were to skip the moral implications,
    I'd still need to figure out how to connect to their network,
    as usually there are authentication issues like being on the
    same subnet even if there is no login/password challenge.

    Of course, since my radio is the powerful one, and currently
    I'm connected to an even more powerful radio than mine is,
    the problem is that I'd be connecting to a far weaker radio
    in this case.

    Since I'd be connecting to a far weaker radio (e.g., it might
    be someone's puny home broadband router two or three miles away),
    the antenna is all that really matters, and the receiver sensitivity,
    both of which are pretty good in my case (and I can get better).

    But, glomming onto someone else's unprotected broadband router
    isn't my way, so, I'm trying to change my IP address, from home,
    a legitimate way.

    The *only* way I can think of (besides changing ISPs every few
    weeks or so) is to switch to public vpn servers.

    But, I can't be such a genius that I figure out, on the first
    pass, the only way something as common as wanting to change your
    IP address is.
     
    Joe Domack, Feb 16, 2015
    #17
  18. Joe Domack

    Tauno Voipio Guest


    Have you thought about the Tor network?
     
    Tauno Voipio, Feb 16, 2015
    #18
  19. Joe Domack

    David Brown Guest

    That's a common arrangement, as it is standard setup for a DHCP server
    (the same thing happens with most LAN DHCP servers).

    If you need a new IP on such a system, you can disconnect, change your
    MAC address, then acquire a new IP. But if you do this often, you are
    going to /really/ annoy your provider, as they run out of spare addresses.
     
    David Brown, Feb 16, 2015
    #19
  20. Joe Domack wrote this copyrighted missive and expects royalties:
    http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/howto-linux-renew-dhcp-client-ip-address/
     
    Chris Ahlstrom, Feb 16, 2015
    #20
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