Is Creative Modem Blaster V.92 USB (DE5671 Model) dial-up modem supported in Linux?

Discussion in 'Linux Networking' started by Ant, Sep 19, 2012.

  1. Ant

    Ant Guest

    Hello.

    I cannot seem to get KNOPPIX v7.0.4 and Ubuntu v12.04.1 i386 live CDs to
    see an old Creative Modem Blaster V.92 USB (DE5671 Model) dial-up modem.
    It worked fine in Windows (XP SP3 to 64-bit 7) on two machines. When I
    plugged it in during a KNOPPIX session, dmesg detects it. Ubuntu
    v12.04.1 i386 live CD detects something, but can't identify it. The
    Linux tests were on an old Dell Dimension 8250 (512 MB of RAM) machine.

    KNOPPIX's dmesg showed:
    ....
    [ 113.693346] usb 4-2: new full-speed USB device number 2 usinguhci_hcd
    [ 118.856286] usb 4-2: New USB device found, idVendor=148d, idProduct=1671
    [ 118.856293] usb 4-2: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=2, SerialNumber=6
    [ 118.856297] usb 4-2: Product: Creative Modem Blaster V.92 USB
    [ 118.856300] usb 4-2: Manufacturer: Creative Pte Ltd.
    [ 118.856303] usb 4-2: SerialNumber: 00000000

    Its lsusb command showed:
    Bus 004 Device 002: ID 148d:1671
    Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub
    Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub
    Bus 003 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
    Bus 004 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
    Bus 005 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
    Bus 006 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
    Weird that lsusb doesn't show the modem?

    Ubuntu showed http://pastie.org/4755128 (too long in this newsgroup
    post).

    For now, I just want to see if KNOPPIX can communicate to this modem
    with its AT commands, but it doesn't seem to find the modem at all even
    though KNOPPIX's dmesg show detections.
    http://knoppix.net/forum/threads/30210-Dial-up-Modem-and-KNOPPIX-v7.0.4-Live-CD-
    's reply told me to use WvDial for the dial-up modem stuff:

    [email protected]:/home/knoppix# wvdial
    --> WvDial: Internet dialer version 1.61
    --> Cannot open /dev/modem: No such file or directory
    --> Cannot open /dev/modem: No such file or directory
    --> Cannot open /dev/modem: No such file or directory

    [email protected]:/home/knoppix# wvdialconf
    Editing `/etc/wvdial.conf'.

    Scanning your serial ports for a modem.

    ttyS0<*1>: ATQ0 V1 E1 -- failed with 2400 baud, next try: 9600 baud
    ttyS0<*1>: ATQ0 V1 E1 -- failed with 9600 baud, next try: 115200 baud
    ttyS0<*1>: ATQ0 V1 E1 -- and failed too at 115200, giving up.
    Modem Port Scan<*1>: S1 S2 S3
    ttyS4<Info>: No such device or address
    Modem Port Scan<*1>: S4


    Sorry, no modem was detected! Is it in use by another program?
    Did you configure it properly with setserial?

    Please read the FAQ at http://alumnit.ca/wiki/?WvDial


    # cat /etc/wvdial.conf
    [Dialer Defaults]
    Phone =
    Username =
    Password =
    New PPPD = yes


    I don't need to dial out yet. Ubuntu's results were worse as shown in
    http://pastie.org/4755128 ... :(

    Thank you in advance. :)
    --
    Quote of the Week: "Every ruler sleeps on an anthill." --Afghani
    /\___/\ Ant(Dude) @ http://antfarm.home.dhs.org (Personal Web Site)
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    Ant, Sep 19, 2012
    #1
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  2. Sounds like a WinModem which is only usable on Linux with a Windows
    driver in special wrapper file. It depends for its operation ordinarily
    in Windows with offloading of processing to the CPU. i looked at the
    Linux Hardware guide and at listings for support where I found only
    Windows drivers.

    Your cross-posting seems a bit extreme.

    bliss
     
    Bobbie Sellers, Sep 19, 2012
    #2
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  3. Ant

    Ant Guest

    Sounds like a WinModem which is only usable on Linux with a Windows
    Ah, that's probably why. I couldn't get it to work in Mac OS X 10.7.4 as
    well. I guess I can't use it except in Windows then. Thanks. :(
    --
    Quote of the Week: "Every ruler sleeps on an anthill." --Afghani
    /\___/\ Ant(Dude) @ http://antfarm.home.dhs.org (Personal Web Site)
    / /\ /\ \ Ant's Quality Foraged Links: http://aqfl.net
    | |o o| |
    \ _ / Please nuke ANT if replying by e-mail. If crediting,
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    Ant, Sep 19, 2012
    #3
  4. Ant

    Whiskers Guest

    ["Followup-To:" header set to comp.os.linux.networking.]
    [...]

    I think that model has a 'Conexant' chipset, in which case it may be
    possible to get it working with Linux
    <http://www.linuxant.com/drivers/hsf/index.php>

    But if you're serious about using a dialup modem, whatever operating system
    is involved, you're better off using a real 'hardware' modem. These are
    (or were!) made as PCI cards for installing on a motherboard, or as PC Card
    (PCMCIA) removable cards, or as external boxes with Serial or USB
    connectors.

    I have had success using a Serial-to-USB adaptor to get a Zoom 3049L Serial
    modem working with Mandrake 9 (and up to Mandriva 2008) - no messing
    around, just connect it up, put the basic configuration into KPPP or some
    other modem dialer package, and you're on line. Lots of flashing lights to
    watch while your data moves, and lots of old-fashioned noises while it's
    establishing a connection.

    A Sitecom PC Card fax/modem has also worked well for me 'on the road'. It
    is inclined to get alarmingly hot, though.

    I haven't tried either of them with current distros, but I would expect
    them to work (unless the hardware breaks).
     
    Whiskers, Sep 19, 2012
    #4
  5. From their license agreement:
    The free version of the drivers is limited to 14.4Kbps.
     
    Johann Klammer, Sep 19, 2012
    #5
  6. +1

    modem PCI cards are still available.

    e.g.
    http://www.usr-emea.com/products/p-dialup-product.asp?prod=hom-5661a&loc=unkg


    --
    Ineptocracy

    (in-ep-toc’-ra-cy) – a system of government where the least capable to
    lead are elected by the least capable of producing, and where the
    members of society least likely to sustain themselves or succeed, are
    rewarded with goods and services paid for by the confiscated wealth of a
    diminishing number of producers.
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Sep 19, 2012
    #6
  7. On the other hand, because they were so cheap, they landed in a lot of
    computers. It's pretty common when I find a computer on the sidewalk
    waiting for the garbage truck for it to have such a modem. It's rare to
    see hardware modems, especially faster speed ones.

    Given that, some of the software modems seemed easier to use with Linux,
    or rather, someone took the time to deal with it. I'm sure there's a list
    of software modems that are easy to use with Linux, find that list and
    then just look for a modem that fits. I suspect it can't take too many
    software modems to find one compatible.

    The problem is that the software modems did start taking up the market
    towards the end of dial-up modems. People got cheap, the computers got
    fast enough, so the hardware modems were likely specifically bought. I
    think the fastest bus hardware modem I saw was 28.8K, and I had to give
    that one up when I moved to a computer that didn't have an ISA bus. I
    don't think I've seen any PCI hardware modems (I'm not saying they dont'
    exist, just pointing out that they became uncommon). External modems,
    they never dropped in price because there was nothing new to come along.
    So it took some time before I could move from my external 33.6K modem to
    56K, finally finding one at a garage sale at a price I was willing to pay,
    then oddly the next week finding another one at another sale. I suspect
    not only that fewer external (and hardware) modems were sold at 56K, but
    since nothing came along to replace them for dial-up, people must have
    kept them as backup. On the other hand, I bought for ten dollars a 56K
    external modem a couple of years ago, I wanted a spare, and then found one
    in a pile of garbage on moving day.

    Michael
     
    Michael Black, Sep 20, 2012
    #7
  8. Ant

    Aragorn Guest

    Check here:

    http://www.linmodems.org
     
    Aragorn, Sep 20, 2012
    #8
  9. Ant

    Ant Guest

    Sounds like a WinModem which is only usable on Linux with a Windows
    Yeah, someone didn't want it and it wasn't even opened and still
    shrinkwrapped (never used). So I took it for kicks to see. Now, I know
    why he/she didn't want it beside being dial-up (still useful to me when
    my cable Internet goes down). Haha.

    I still have my old external serial USR Sportster 33.6k (only connects
    at 28800-31200 speeds on crappy old copper landlines) dial-up modem at
    home. It still works as of 1.75 years ago when I tested it. :) I was
    hoping to find a cheap/free USB one since serial/COM types are pretty
    much gone these days.
    --
    Quote of the Week: "Every ruler sleeps on an anthill." --Afghani
    /\___/\ Ant(Dude) @ http://antfarm.home.dhs.org (Personal Web Site)
    / /\ /\ \ Ant's Quality Foraged Links: http://aqfl.net
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    ( ) then please kindly use Ant nickname and AQFL URL/link.
     
    Ant, Sep 20, 2012
    #9
  10. Ant

    Ant Guest

    I think that model has a 'Conexant' chipset, in which case it may be
    Yeah, I am having no luck in getting it to work so far. See
    http://knoppix.net/forum/threads/30210-Dial-up-Modem-and-KNOPPIX-v7.0.4-Live-CD-...
    for the details. It is getting a bit complex.

    I just want to have it as a back up. I rarely use it, but it is useful
    when my cable Internet goes down.

    Oh, those USB+serial work well for old serial dial-up modems? I still
    have my external serial USR Sportster 33.6k modem. It worked as of 1.75
    years ago when I tested it. It won't last forever for sure. I was hoping
    to USB modems too since I got one for free that no one wanted and use it
    on any machines with USB ports like Mac OS X and Linux. Also, serial
    ports are rare these days.
    --
    Quote of the Week: "Every ruler sleeps on an anthill." --Afghani
    /\___/\ Ant(Dude) @ http://antfarm.home.dhs.org (Personal Web Site)
    / /\ /\ \ Ant's Quality Foraged Links: http://aqfl.net
    | |o o| |
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    Ant, Sep 20, 2012
    #10
  11. Ant

    T. Dwyer Guest

    The USROBOTIC'S is a Hardware USB modem which is seen in Linux as TTY/ACMO.
    T.D.
     
    T. Dwyer, Sep 20, 2012
    #11
  12. Ant

    Ant Guest

    I still have my old external serial USR Sportster 33.6k (only connects
    I can, but it's very old and will die one day. I need to replacements
    when that happen. ;)
    --
    Quote of the Week: "Every ruler sleeps on an anthill." --Afghani
    /\___/\ Ant(Dude) @ http://antfarm.home.dhs.org (Personal Web Site)
    / /\ /\ \ Ant's Quality Foraged Links: http://aqfl.net
    | |o o| |
    \ _ / Please nuke ANT if replying by e-mail. If crediting,
    ( ) then please kindly use Ant nickname and AQFL URL/link.
     
    Ant, Sep 20, 2012
    #12
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