Is a single-port ADSL router the same as a single-port ethernet modem?

Discussion in 'Broadband' started by Graeme Allen, Jan 26, 2004.

  1. Graeme Allen

    Graeme Allen Guest

    I looking fo a solution to share my ADSL on my 2PC home network, but I
    want to stop using Internet Connection Sharing and my USB modem. I
    already have a 4-port ethernet hub.

    Is a single-port ADSL router the same as a single-port ethernet modem?
    If not what exactly is the difference?

    Thanks,
    G
     
    Graeme Allen, Jan 26, 2004
    #1
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  2. Graeme Allen

    Tiscali Tim Guest

    In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
    The router would connect to the ADSL line, and to the hub rather than to one
    of the computers - and would do the sharing, thus removing the need for ICS.
    It shares the single ISP-provided IP address between all the computers on
    your network, and does the necessary address translation - so that each
    packet of internet data gets routed to the correct computer. It also means
    that your computers are independent - and don't have to rely on a particular
    one being up and running in order to get internet access.

    [In your current arrangement, the "router" function is performed by the PC
    to which the USB ADSL modem is connected].

    I'm not sure that I've answered your question! I don't know a lot about
    ethernet modems - but aren't they what you would use with a cable as opposed
    to ADSL connection to connect a single computer?
     
    Tiscali Tim, Jan 26, 2004
    #2
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  3. Graeme Allen

    NAZGUL Guest

    I looking fo a solution to share my ADSL on my 2PC home network, but I
    want to stop using Internet Connection Sharing and my USB modem. I
    already have a 4-port ethernet hub.

    Is a single-port ADSL router the same as a single-port ethernet modem?
    If not what exactly is the difference?

    Thanks,


    -------
    A modem does the conecting, the router routes data to computers, so if you
    have a modem/router combo it can conect and share, if you have a modem it
    conects to a single machine, if you have a router it take the net feed and
    shares it, though I would say that you can pick up a modem with 4 port
    router for not much more than a single port one and in general usb is not
    the best way to conect a device that is used often as most motherboards have
    not got very good usb due to low cost boards being common.
     
    NAZGUL, Jan 26, 2004
    #3
  4. Graeme Allen

    Peter Guest

    A router (unless configured to be wide open) hides your PC (and other
    PCs netwrorked to it) from the internet.

    A modem enables anyone on the internet to see your whole network -
    unless you have all the security properly set up, the latest Micro$oft
    patches applied, you name it...

    Example: I get hit by Blaster roughly once per minute, especially in
    the evenings. If I was on a modem, and didn't have the latest patches,
    I would get infected within a minute. But a router which does NAT
    blocks this - even if configured to be wide open.


    Peter.
     
    Peter, Jan 26, 2004
    #4
  5. Graeme Allen

    Gareth Jones Guest

    One thing that I'd like to point out is that the wording on the boxes of
    some of these products is a little misleading/confusing for the newbie.
    When it says something like 'broadband/ADSL router with 4 port switch',
    you might expect it to be able to connect to your broadband
    connection..... and then give you a router and switch...... well it
    does... but it itself can't connect directly without an additional
    modem!! Unless of course you get a model that STATES 'modem' as well!?!

    I've seen loads of people in PC world standing there scratching their
    heads ;-)
    --
    __________________________________________________
    Personal email for Gareth Jones can be sent to:
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    Gareth Jones, Jan 26, 2004
    #5
  6. Graeme Allen

    Mugwump Guest

    But they were the staff!
     
    Mugwump, Jan 26, 2004
    #6
  7. Graeme Allen

    Gareth Jones Guest

    LOL!

    But no, the staff were scratching their armpits and eating bananas.....

    --
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    Personal email for Gareth Jones can be sent to:
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    Gareth Jones, Jan 26, 2004
    #7
  8. Graeme Allen

    Graeme Allen Guest

    One thing that I'd like to point out is that the wording on the boxes of

    Thanks all for your answers.

    http://www.dsl-warehouse.co.uk/ has a list of single port ADSL
    routers, that all include modems, and a seperate list of single port
    ethernet ADSL modems. Do all these do the same thing? Surely a
    single port router does not route, as there is only one connection. Am
    I right?

    Anyway, I think I'll buy Dabs ADSL Conexant 4 Port
    http://www.dabs.com/uk/shopbybrand/...odems_and_adsl/ProductView.htm?quicklinx=17P8
    It should do what I want.
     
    Graeme Allen, Jan 26, 2004
    #8
  9. Graeme Allen

    Gareth Jones Guest

    No. Think of the router as a programmable filter!
    A modem will just pass the data in/out regardless. If you then stick a
    router 'in line' with the data between the modem and your PC or
    Hub/switch (i.e. a single port) then the router can be made to do things
    like only allow traffic through that its supposed to, or if you
    configure it as a DHCP server, it can allocate IP addresses to all the
    different devices on your network so you don't have to dedicate one
    computer to be on all the time running internet connection sharing etc
    etc....

    --
    __________________________________________________
    Personal email for Gareth Jones can be sent to:
    'usenet4gareth' followed by an at symbol
    followed by 'uk2' followed by a dot
    followed by 'net'
    __________________________________________________
     
    Gareth Jones, Jan 26, 2004
    #9
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