Does Linux provides everything what Windows OS provides?

Discussion in 'Linux Networking' started by tvnaidu, Apr 22, 2005.

  1. tvnaidu

    tvnaidu Guest

    I am thinking of buying Linux machines instead of Windows machines,
    this way we can get it for cheap, my question is, Do we get everything
    in Linux what Windows provides? (is there any packeage in Linux
    equivalent to MS office - word/excel/powerPoint)?. This small office
    contains 5 employees, we need 5 PC's and one Server, If I load Fedora
    on all 5 machines (each one for each employee) and one server (RH Linux
    9.0 server), will it be OK for small office?, also we need Web server
    and Mail server (we already have web hosting from third party, they
    says we can read e-mail from web), we want to install some e-mail
    client on each employee machine, but mainly we have lot of internal
    docs, which we would like to keep on internal web server, for easy
    access to every employee. Please suggest me how can we configure this
    samll office with Linux (no windows). Appreciated, please advice me.
    Can I download Fedora and RH 9.0 from RH?.
     
    tvnaidu, Apr 22, 2005
    #1
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  2. tvnaidu

    Dave Uhring Guest

    If you already have the required number of computers why buy new ones?
    No. You do not get any vulnerability to email-borne viruses. You do not
    get any vulnerability to spyware/adware delivered through Internet
    Exploder. Your Internetworked systems are not vulnerable to the massive
    wave of Windows worms.
    No!! Fedora Core is merely alpha or beta quality software and is hardly
    fit for production use. Red Hat Linux 9 is completely unsupported by Red
    Hat and has not been supported for a year less 9 days.

    If you want Red Hat then get a currently supported version of Red Hat.
    Better yet and for less expense buy Novell's SuSE Linux.
    Almost all Linux distributions contain the necessary software.
    Your best option is to hire, on a contract basis, a competent Linux
    consultant to set up the network and provide the hand holding you will
    require. You would be exposed to the same expense even if you chose the
    Microsfot "solution".
    Waste of bandwidth.
     
    Dave Uhring, Apr 22, 2005
    #2
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  3. tvnaidu

    P Collins Guest

    Linux is probably a better option for office computers than Windows.

    Reasons (from a Windows to Linux convert and IMHO):

    1) Practically immune to spyware/malware/viruses/worms. These are a
    MAJOR problem for Windows PCs, just about every one I've come across at
    college are infected. Even with a dedicated IT team.

    2) More stable than Windows.

    3) Versatile and highly configurable desktops. I was impressed at how
    much I can configure my desktop in Linux.

    4) Virtual desktops. No cluttered windows, just switch between work,
    web browsing, etc. VDs.

    5) More secure than Windows. Even if a hacker breaks into your network,
    they can only do limited damage without root access.

    Lots of Linux distributions around. I suggest speaking to a Linux
    consultant as Dave said and asking them to show you a few.

    The two major weaknesses of Linux, poor games compatibility and issues
    with newer hardware, aren't relevant for office computers which
    (generally) don't play games and have less cutting edge specs than
    gaming machines.
     
    P Collins, Apr 22, 2005
    #3
  4. tvnaidu

    James Knott Guest

    No. You don't get all the viruses. ;-)
    OpenOffice is a good package, that works well with MS Office files. It's
    also available on Mac, Windows and other Unix systems.
    I think you'll find all you need, in most distros.
     
    James Knott, Apr 22, 2005
    #4
  5. Put Fedora Core 3 on all 6 machines. RH 9.0 is the ancestor of Fedora
    Core, it's obsolete. FC3 has everything that RH9 had and more, but more
    importantly it's current.

    Open Office is very nice, it can do pretty much everything that MS Office
    can do. Evolution is a great mail client, it can do everything that
    Outlook can do except give your machine a virus. Users who are familiar
    with Outlook won't have any problem with Evolution. FC3 comes with Firefox
    for web browsing and Pan for news groups. Gpdf is a good PDF reader. You
    can also download and install Acrobat 7. FC3 comes with Apache which is
    the industry standard web server. It also comes with mail servers and
    database servers. You will want to download and install webmin from
    http://www.webmin.com. The Redhat configuration tools are good for
    somethings but webmin is better, especially for doing things like setting
    up servers.
     
    General Schvantzkoph, Apr 22, 2005
    #5
  6. tvnaidu

    mjt Guest

    () scribbled:
    .... yes. but you better get a Linux consultant
    to come in and do the installs and the training.

    if you dont, you will fail. you MUST get someone
    in that understands Linux, the applications that
    run under it, and understands how to train people
    to use it.

    there's a strong paradigm shift involved, and if
    it's not done properly, the transition will fail.
     
    mjt, Apr 22, 2005
    #6
  7. tvnaidu

    jcdude2525 Guest

    If I load Fedora
    You should give Slackware a try. Like somebody said before, Fedora
    isn't the best for production machines, it's software is to bleeding
    edge (X and Gnome froze up on me a couple times using it). Slackware
    is rock solid stable, you can't blow it away with M80's. You basically
    install, and then let it go untill the next release comes out, then
    upgrade then, and then let it go untill the next release comes out, and
    so on. KDE is a good Desktop enviornment (unless you have been living
    off the shell for the past year, like I have, then XFCE all the way!)
    to use.

    Sure, Slackware isn't intended for the Linux newbie, but there is so
    much documentation and help avaliable for Slackware. There are IRC
    channels (#slackware on irc.oftc.net, ##slackware on irc.freenode.net),
    there is a book (http://www.slackware.com/book), and there is the
    alt.os.linux.slackware group on google groups, and more.
    Slackware does that. Slackware has Apache 1.3, you can put MySQL and
    PHP and OpenSSL into it. I've never set up mail servers, but servers
    like popa3d and sendmail and (I think) posfix is included in Slackware.
    Like many others said, no you don't get hacked 24/7/365, and you arn't
    wasting time with viruses and worms and what not.

    If you ask anybody who's been using Linux for over a year or two,
    they'll probably say either "Hey I remember Slackware it was awsome,"
    or "Yea I use Slackware, and always will." I'm the "Yea I use
    Slackware, and always will."

    http://www.slackware.com
    http://www.userlocal.com
    http://www.linuxforums.org
    http://www.linuxquestions.org

    There are some good sites. And #slackware on irc.oftc.net is a really
    nice place to get help with slackware if you need it, ##slackware on
    irc.freenode.net works to.
     
    jcdude2525, Apr 22, 2005
    #7
  8. tvnaidu

    ray Guest

    OpenOffice is available and provides most MS Office functionality -
    version 2.0 is supposed to include the database software. I use AbiWord
    because it's smaller, faster and works better on some complex formatting
    than OO does. I use Gnumeric for spreadsheet because it's smaller/faster.
    IMHO the PowerPoint equivalent in OO is much easier to use. All the
    programs import the MS file formates (and will export them too. Yes, you
    can download free. It's fairly easy to set up e-mail and Apache web server.
    www.tldp.org has howto's to accomplish most linux tasks.
     
    ray, Apr 22, 2005
    #8
  9. tvnaidu

    Carl Fink Guest

    Agreeing with everyone, you might want to download one or more Live CD's.
    They have names like Knoppix and Ubuntu and Mepis and Conectiva.

    If your computer supports booting off a CD-ROM, you can use a Live CD to see
    how you like Linux, without installing it and with zero risk and zero chance
    of data loss (short of you doing something really stupid).

    Ubuntu and Mepis are spinoffs of Debian, my personal favorite distribution.

    You can find a Live CD listing (including at least two non-Linux ones for
    variations on BSD) at

    http://www.frozentech.com/content/livecd.php

    Some of the listings are a bit obsolete, though.
     
    Carl Fink, Apr 22, 2005
    #9
  10. Why pay at all when there's ubuntu. My home network is about the size
    of the company OT mentions. Read about my setup at:
    http://rolfas.net/?page_id=314

    It's (almost) installed exclusively from the Ubuntu repositories. The
    "almost" is a couple of php-applications I have installed.
    I agree. For a single client you can just install and learn as you go,
    but for a business critical environment it is wise to have a paid hand
    to assist you and do the work you're supposed to do instead. :)
    Agreed.
     
    Rolf Arne Schulze, Apr 22, 2005
    #10
  11. It is. I have tried the database software in the Beta and it looks to
    be very good. You can use an openoffice internal database structure,
    as in acces, or you can connect to other DMBS-es, for instance mysql,
    via odbc/jdbc.
     
    Rolf Arne Schulze, Apr 22, 2005
    #11
  12. tvnaidu

    Malte Guest

    It certainly does provide at least one thing Windows doesn't: fun.
     
    Malte, Apr 22, 2005
    #12
  13. tvnaidu

    Dave Uhring Guest

    That is your *home* network not a network used in production in a business
    enterprise. Perhaps in time you will learn to recognize the differences.
     
    Dave Uhring, Apr 22, 2005
    #13
  14. No need to be rude. Have you read anything about ubuntu at all? Before
    you trash my posts here, please read up on http://www.ubuntulinux.org/
    and especially part where you can buy support.
     
    Rolf Arne Schulze, Apr 22, 2005
    #14
  15. tvnaidu

    Chris Cole Guest

    I totally agree with most of what others have said. Especially the bit
    about getting a consultant in as you don't seem have any/much experience
    of Linux. However, a way to ease your transition is to use as much of the
    OSS apps in windows before hand to check compatibility with currrent data
    and to get your users used to the changes. Specifically progs like
    Openoffice, Firefox (browser) and Thunderbird (email) are available for
    windows and linux.

    Also, one confusing issue (for a windows person) with linux is the sheer
    choice. It's no longer 'I have a PC I must use windows', it's 'I have a PC,
    which Linux distribution meets my needs most?'. As others have said a paid
    for version of Suse or RH would give you the most peace of mind.
    HTH
    Chris.
     
    Chris Cole, Apr 22, 2005
    #15
  16. tvnaidu

    KG Guest

    If you already have 5 pc's, then recycle them and get them to work as
    diskless workstation. Consolidate all your savings and invest your $ on
    1 or 1 + 1 redundant terminal servers. More details on such a setup can
    be found at http://k12ltsp.org/contents.html.

    Just a suggestion.
     
    KG, Apr 22, 2005
    #16
  17. tvnaidu

    essteeaenn Guest

    : Linux is probably a better option for office computers than Windows.

    : Reasons (from a Windows to Linux convert and IMHO):

    : 1) Practically immune to spyware/malware/viruses/worms. These are a
    : MAJOR problem for Windows PCs, just about every one I've come across at
    : college are infected. Even with a dedicated IT team.

    properly admined Windows boxes are equally immune. Sounds like
    your "dedicated IT team" needs to take some lessons in Windows admin.


    : 2) More stable than Windows.

    yep.


    : 3) Versatile and highly configurable desktops. I was impressed at how
    : much I can configure my desktop in Linux.

    yep- since it runs X there's lots of choices.


    : 4) Virtual desktops. No cluttered windows, just switch between work,
    : web browsing, etc. VDs.

    ditto Windows.


    : 5) More secure than Windows. Even if a hacker breaks into your network,
    : they can only do limited damage without root access.

    ditto windows. Actually Windows is more secure in this manner since
    it generally doesn't run remote services (ftp/telnet/etc) like
    unix variants do.


    : Lots of Linux distributions around. I suggest speaking to a Linux
    : consultant as Dave said and asking them to show you a few.

    yep


    Stan
     
    essteeaenn, Apr 22, 2005
    #17
  18. tvnaidu

    H. S. Guest

    Apparently, _, on 22/04/05 10:31,typed:

    Aren't free virtual desktops(downloadable from MS downloads site)
    available only in Windows XP?

    ->HS
     
    H. S., Apr 22, 2005
    #18
  19. tvnaidu

    essteeaenn Guest

    : Apparently, _, on 22/04/05 10:31,typed:

    :> : 4) Virtual desktops. No cluttered windows, just switch between work,
    :> : web browsing, etc. VDs.
    :>
    :> ditto Windows.
    :>


    : Aren't free virtual desktops(downloadable from MS downloads site)
    : available only in Windows XP?

    Sure- but (1) other versions of windows are long obsolete
    and (2) there are scads of downloadable virtual desktops from
    many authors. XDesk for instance has a mouse-knocking
    feature that is very slick. One nice thing about
    many of the virtual desktop managers in Windows
    is that they take up _zero_ desktop space. I'm not
    aware of any for Linux that don't take up desktop space.
     
    essteeaenn, Apr 22, 2005
    #19
  20. However, in an office with 5 PCs it is unlikely that there is a
    "dedicated IT team, well trained or otherwise.

    The fact is that for such an office Windows is a *disaster*, and
    Linux is a breeze.

    ....
    That is questionable under any circumstance, but once again this
    is a 5 PC office without an IT staff. Windows is a disaster.

    The OP does need to keep in mind that despite all of the
    flexibility and advantage of Linux, Bill Gate has been *very*
    successful at making Windows indispensable. If this office does
    business with others who use MS products they will almost
    certainly run into occasions when they need to look at something
    using the proprietary facilities available only via Windows.

    For that reason I would suggest that an office with 5 people
    needs have at least *seven* computers. The 5 people can run
    Linux on their desktop PC's, and the whole thing can be
    networked with a Linux based server. (I'm assuming the
    firewall/router function is separate, but that might well be
    Linux based too, even if it is a Linksys black box, for
    example.) And...

    There should be, off in a corner somewhere, well protected
    behind at least one firewall and for that matter perhaps even
    restricted from various parts of the local ethernet, a Windows
    box that can 1) never be used for email, and 2) is used for
    anything which can only be done with Windows (e.g., look at
    spreadsheets in a proprietary format). This machine could
    also be a laptop...
     
    Floyd L. Davidson, Apr 22, 2005
    #20
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