Does a Rocket M2 dish fit for a Rocket M5 radio?

Discussion in 'Wireless Internet' started by Alphonse Arnaud, Sep 12, 2014.

  1. I'm getting lousy speeds lately because everyone around me has
    a Rocket M2 on the same AP that I'm on (we're all unthrottled).

    The Rocket M5 that one neighbor has, is getting twice the bandwidth
    because the 5GHz AP is hardly used.

    If I buy a Rocket M5 radio, is it plugin-compatible with the M2
    in the Rocket M2 dish configuration?
     
    Alphonse Arnaud, Sep 12, 2014
    #1
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  2. On Fri, 12 Sep 2014 18:13:22 +0000 (UTC), Alphonse Arnaud

    Where are you finding these names?
    The surest sign of success if over-crowding, pollution, congestion,
    traffic jams, etc. WISP over Wi-Fi is successful.
    Yep. We'll see how long that lasts.
    The hardware is plug compatible. However, the 2.4GHz dish will NOT
    work on 5.7GHz. You'll need either a new RD-5G30 dish or one of the
    5Ghz Ubiquiti radios that has a build in panel/patch antenna.
    <http://www.streakwave.com/itemdesc.asp?ic=RD-5G30>
    Note that the beamwidth of a 5GHz dish of similar size to your
    existing 2.4GHz barbeque grill dish is somewhat narrower (5 deg).
    <http://www.streakwave.com/mmSWAVE1/Video/RocketDish_Datasheet.pdf>
    Aiming the dish from the top of your 30ft pipe mount is going to be
    tricky.

    Diversion: The local radio club had a pair of Cisco AP1200 series
    wireless bridge radios with 24dBi barbeque grill dish antennas on a
    1.5 mile link (to where we could get cheap DSL). Unfortunately, the
    local PAMF hospital was along the line of sight. 2.4GHz was totally
    useless. With the dish antenna, I could see 15+ access points in the
    hospital and about a dozen more in the yacht harbor further along the
    same line of sight. We switched to a pair of Ubiquiti 5Ghz
    Linkstation Nano radios and have lived happily ever after for the last
    3 years.
     
    Jeff Liebermann, Sep 13, 2014
    #2
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  3. Jeff Liebermann wrote, on Fri, 12 Sep 2014 16:03:21 -0700:
    :)

    Step 0. Select arbitrary nationality.
    Step 1. Google "most common <insert nationality> surnames".
    Step 2. Google "most common <insert nationality> given names".

    You should meet us at our weekly Wednesday "inventors lunch",
    up in Redwood City, at noon some day. The guys would love you,
    and you, they.
    Drat. I was afraid of that.

    I'm gonna borrow a tripod and Rocket setup from a neighbor and
    see if I can get the speeds he's getting (30Mbps symmetric).

    If so, I'm gonna get a new RD5G30 and Rocket M2 to add to my
    collection of the Bullet (my first), the NanoBridge (my 2nd),
    and the Rocket M2 (my current rooftop radio).
    You remember far too much.

    That pipe mount was for Hilltop WISP, and is still pointed at Loren's
    antenna's on the next ridge over, but the POE to its Bullet M2 attached
    to a 14dBi planar antenna isn't plugged in anymore because Ridge W/L
    has been very reliable, but their AP uses the dual polarization that
    the Nanobridge and Rocket M2 have on AirOS.

    Diversion:
    Surfnet was the pits. While I'm relatively new to WISP, compared to you,
    I know enough now that my first WISP, Surfnet, is the pits. How
    such arrogance can survive in today's business world is beyond me.
    I am still learning, but I *love* the Ubiquiti equipment!
     
    Alphonse Arnaud, Sep 13, 2014
    #3
  4. Oh. I thought you were using a program:
    Thanks, but no more geek fests for me. I'm saturated with too much
    technology and need to dry out.
    That's how progress works. Everything you own is obsolete, everything
    you know is wrong, and old technology rapidly depreciates in value.
    Good idea. I think Ridge supports MIMO on 5GHz. If not, a Rocket M5
    would be overkill and a Bullet M5 will be a cheaper alternative.
    There's also a somewhat cheaper barbeque grill style antenna for the
    Bullet M5 (AirGrid AG-5G23-HP):
    <http://dl.ubnt.com/ag5_datasheet.pdf>
    However, the Rocket M5 and solid 5GHz dishes are generally better. If
    you have a good strong signal and clear path, one of the radios with
    an integrated antenna might also work, such as one of the Loco series.

    Note that if you can connect at the fastest possible rate, the amount
    of air time that your connection will require to move a given amount
    of data is less. With wireless, it's the air time that's shared among
    all the users. Since the radio system can only service one client
    radio at a time, less air time used means more users or more data can
    be moved. One user, running at the slowest possible speed, will slow
    everyone else down.
    There are those that worship in the temple of old technology, but I
    don't think your collection is old enough yet for a tax deductible
    contribution:
    <http://www.computerhistory.org>
    Hang onto the collection for a few decades and it might then be
    suitable for donation.
    I've tried to forget, but they keep coming back in my dreams and
    nightmares. I only remember the strange, odd, disgusting, and
    abominable. Your antenna structure qualifies for all of these. Your
    inside wiring is a close second. I would have expected the pipe mount
    to have failed in the rain and wind, but I guess it was saved by
    global warming and the lack of rain.
    OK. Got it. Please let me know when it changes again.
    Yep. Good stuff.
     
    Jeff Liebermann, Sep 13, 2014
    #4
  5. Jeff Liebermann wrote, on Sat, 13 Sep 2014 08:42:52 -0700:
    Yes. Ridge Wireless is on MIMO. They also just bought and sat out the
    waiting period for a 300 Mbps full-duplex link backhaul from Cupertino
    to the mountains and then an AirFiber 24 link into the hills aimed at us.
    Ever since our nanobridge fiascos, we've come to love the rockets!
    It was an amazingly simple mount, what with a toilet bowl bottom pipe
    holding it into the old satellite dish cut-off mount. :) (KISS).

    Since then, I've helped install perhaps a dozen antennas, on roofs,
    decks, trees, you name it. Wherever we can get a signal, we put
    the antenna. It's a neighborhood project, that everyone pitches
    in on.
     
    Alphonse Arnaud, Sep 13, 2014
    #5
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