Connecting a cable from my router to a Cat5 socket

Discussion in 'Broadband' started by Murmansk, Aug 17, 2015.

  1. Murmansk

    Murmansk Guest

    This is probably fairly straightforward but I don't know the answer.

    I want to have a socket near to my TV into which I can plug a Cat5/Ethernetpatch cable and the other end of that cable will go into whatever YouView/internet TV box box I decide to get.

    This is going on behind the TV in my front room but my router is in the hall, so I plan to get a long Cat5 cable and plug that into one of the socketson the router, then take the cable under the floor and out of the floor tofeed the socket behind the TV

    My question is, once I have chopped off the plug on the end of the cable near the socket, how do I do work out the connections to the back of the socket? Which core goes to which connector on the socket and are they going to be IDC connectors that I'll simply connect like a phone socket using my Krone tool?

    Ta
     
    Murmansk, Aug 17, 2015
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Murmansk

    Mike Barnes Guest

    It would easier and more reliable to use one of these:
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/291253536930

    But a better solution would be fixed Cat5 wiring between two fixed
    sockets, and two short patch cables. Instructions are easily found on
    the web, for example:

    http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/how-to/network-wifi/how-wire-ethernet-wall-socket-3529650/
     
    Mike Barnes, Aug 17, 2015
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Murmansk

    Woody Guest

    This is probably fairly straightforward but I don't know the answer.

    I want to have a socket near to my TV into which I can plug a
    Cat5/Ethernet patch cable and the other end of that cable will go into
    whatever YouView/internet TV box box I decide to get.

    This is going on behind the TV in my front room but my router is in
    the hall, so I plan to get a long Cat5 cable and plug that into one of
    the sockets on the router, then take the cable under the floor and out
    of the floor to feed the socket behind the TV

    My question is, once I have chopped off the plug on the end of the
    cable near the socket, how do I do work out the connections to the
    back of the socket? Which core goes to which connector on the socket
    and are they going to be IDC connectors that I'll simply connect like
    a phone socket using my Krone tool?




    Better still get a TP-Link WR702N which is a wi-fi to ethernet
    interface unit, currently £16.99 in Expensive World.

    Works a treat with my Hummy YouView box and was a doddle to set up.
    Note you do NOT have to have an account with anyone - anything you can
    get free on your PC (such as iPlayer, Demand 5 etc) you will get on a
    box.

    I have a Hummy YouView box and a Huawei DN370T TalkTalk box.
    Admittedly the TT box is a bit slow but it produces and records good
    HD and for about £40 BNIB is a bargain. I'll have to try it out with
    my Sky (freesat) box.
     
    Woody, Aug 17, 2015
    #3
  4. Murmansk

    Murmansk Guest

    Thanks for those contributions - very useful.

    I quite like the idea of a network socket like I have at work but clearly there are other ways too
     
    Murmansk, Aug 17, 2015
    #4
  5. Murmansk

    Andy Burns Guest

    Andy Burns, Aug 17, 2015
    #5
  6. Murmansk

    Woody Guest

    That is exactly what the WR702N will provide albeit by radio rather
    than a cable.
     
    Woody, Aug 18, 2015
    #6
  7. I see nobody has mentioned Powerline/Homeplug sevices yet. They're
    another possible solution if cabling is not feasible and wireless
    doesn't work very well.

    I have a mixture of ethernet cabling, Netgear Powerline devices,
    built-in wireless adaptors and an external wireless bridge (in my case
    the Edimax 7228n).

    Rod.
     
    Roderick Stewart, Aug 18, 2015
    #7
  8. Murmansk

    Woody Guest

    The downside of powerline devices is the RFI they produce across many
    radio bands. You may not be popular with any radio amateurs or
    shortwave listeners who live nearby!
     
    Woody, Aug 18, 2015
    #8
  9. Murmansk

    Paul Cummins Guest

    As a Radio amateur, I have no problem with my own PLT systems...
     
    Paul Cummins, Aug 18, 2015
    #9
  10. Murmansk

    Murmansk Guest

    Experience of wi-fi and powerline solutions have led me to prefer a decent cable connection where possible as it's far more robust
     
    Murmansk, Aug 18, 2015
    #10
  11. Murmansk

    Eednud Guest

    Connect the wires as below:


    1 White/Orange
    2 Orange White
    3 White/Green
    4 Blue/White
    5 White/Blue
    6 Green/White
    7 White/Brown
    8 Brown/White

    Thats assuming the patch lead and outlet are 568B compliant, which if
    bought in the UK, they should be
     
    Eednud, Aug 18, 2015
    #11
  12. Murmansk

    UnsteadyKen Guest

    Murmansk says...
    You would be better off fitting a small network switch near the TV.
     
    UnsteadyKen, Aug 18, 2015
    #12
  13. It's raining today. I'm getting 2mbit on my wi-fi. It was 5.5 yesterday.
    (the signal goes through a _very_ large bush)

    Andy
     
    Vir Campestris, Aug 18, 2015
    #13
  14. Patch leads are made of stranded cable, and you want solid core for
    connecting to the IDC connectors on the back of a socket. You should run
    a length of solid-core Cat 5 (actually I would use Cat 6) from the hall
    to the living room and put a socket on each end, then plug a short patch
    lead in at each end. The colours are usually marked on the back of the
    socket - it's important to keep the pairs together, each wire with its
    corresponding white.

    Mike
     
    Mike Humphrey, Aug 19, 2015
    #14
  15. En el artículo <>,
    Same here. PLT seems ok for general web browsing, etc. but I've had
    large file transfers corrupted in spite of the 'guaranteed reliable'
    nature of TCP/IP. This doesn't inspire confidence, especially when
    backing up to a remote server.

    I've always preferred to run cable in the past, but the layout of my
    current house makes it awkward. Going to have to bite the bullet and do
    it though, I think.
     
    Mike Tomlinson, Aug 19, 2015
    #15
  16. Which bands do you listen on?
     
    Brian Gregory, Aug 21, 2015
    #16
  17. Good point.
     
    Brian Gregory, Aug 21, 2015
    #17
  18. Murmansk

    Graham. Guest

    Pound to a pinch it's not 2200m, 600m or even Topband.
     
    Graham., Aug 21, 2015
    #18
  19. Murmansk

    Graham. Guest

    Although it's wrong, you will usually get away with kroneing stranded
    cable.
    Crimping normal RJ45 plugs onto solid cable is likley to fail
    dismally.
    You can get special plugs for solid.
     
    Graham., Aug 21, 2015
    #19
  20. Murmansk

    Paul Cummins Guest

    Which bands do you listen on?[/QUOTE]

    DC to Daylight :)

    I can work Top band to 1200MHz with the equipment I have.
     
    Paul Cummins, Aug 22, 2015
    #20
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.