Can turning up line signal cause poor line attenuation?

Discussion in 'Broadband' started by Simon Fearby, Aug 31, 2003.

  1. Simon Fearby

    Simon Fearby Guest

    I asked BT to turn up the signal on the line when we first moved in as I was
    running a rubbish 3com dial up modem and it kept dropping the
    connection.Could that explain the 63dB attenuation I get and 15dB SNR?
    Operational data report : near end (Downstream)
    -----------------------------------------------
    Attainable line rate : 2460 kbit/sec
    Attainable Atm rate : 2176 kbit/sec
    Used line rate : 744 kbit/sec
    Fast used Atm rate : 576 kbit/sec
    Interleaved used Atm rate : 0 kbits/sec
    Rel. capacity occupation : 30
    Noise Margin : 15 dB
    Line attenuation : 63 dB
    Output Power : 17 dBm

    Near End line operational data :
    RelCapacity downstream = 30 pct
    NoiseMargin downstream = 15.5 dB
    OutputPower upstream = 12.0 dBm
    Attenuation downsteam = 63.5 dB
    Operational Mode = 2

    Far end line operational data
    relCapacity upstream = 54 pct
    noiseMargin upstream = 17.0 dB
    outputPower downstream = 17.0 dBm
    Attenuation upstream = 31.5 dB

    I hope so - I cant get 1MB otherwise!
     
    Simon Fearby, Aug 31, 2003
    #1
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  2. Simon Fearby

    Sunil Sood Guest

    If your reading is 63dB you have no chance of getting 1MB adsl atm - you
    only just make 512K if that (assuming the router's reading is accurate)

    You currently need less than 45dB to get 1 or 2MB (unless/until BT
    introduce RADSL for these higher speeds)

    A +3dB increase in the reading actually means your line loss has doubled
    as it uses a log scale..

    Regards
    Sunil
     
    Sunil Sood, Aug 31, 2003
    #2
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