Can I add a "g" wireless access point to a lan that already has a "b" dhcp access point?

Discussion in 'Wireless Internet' started by Bruce Chastain, Feb 17, 2004.

  1. I just got a 2Wire 802.11b/router/dsl modem/access point/firewall/home
    networking (phone lines) box and everything is working perfectly.

    However, I'd like to also have the ability to link at higher speeds for some
    devices, at the 802.11g speeds, without having to replace all of the above
    functionality.

    Is it possible to just add a new 802.11g access point to my network (via an
    Ethernet switch), disable DHCP in the new "g" device (to avoid having more
    than one DHCP server), and have everything work well? Will the new 802.11g
    access point automatically use the old 80211b DHCP server for assigning IPs
    to whomever connects through the 80211g access point?

    Thanks!
    Bruce.
     
    Bruce Chastain, Feb 17, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. On Tue, 17 Feb 2004 20:43:07 GMT, Bruce Chastain spoketh
    Sure you can. Most 802.11G WAPs support both "B" and "G" speeds
    (however, it may adversely affect "G" speeds). You should be able to set
    it to "G Only", so your router will be the source for you "B" clients,
    while the WAP is for "G" clients only.

    And, WAPs doesn't normally have DHCP servers, so that's not going to be
    an issue...


    Lars M. Hansen
    www.hansenonline.net
    Remove "bad" from my e-mail address to contact me.
    "If you try to fail, and succeed, which have you done?"
     
    Lars M. Hansen, Feb 17, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Excellent. Another good reason to have the 'b' and 'g' access points in
    seperate boxes.
    Interesting. I thought any access point needed to have a DHCP server to
    assign IPs to the wireless devices that connect. If not, then that makes it
    all the simpler! :)

    Thanks!
    Bruce.
     
    Bruce Chastain, Feb 17, 2004
    #3
  4. On Tue, 17 Feb 2004 21:18:09 GMT, Bruce Chastain spoketh
    I think the idea behind an access point is that it is an addition to an
    existing network, and that there's already a DHCP server in the mix.
    However, a wireless router would often be considered the central point
    in a network (existing or not), and thus has a DHCP server.

    Lars M. Hansen
    www.hansenonline.net
    Remove "bad" from my e-mail address to contact me.
    "If you try to fail, and succeed, which have you done?"
     
    Lars M. Hansen, Feb 17, 2004
    #4
  5. I think the idea behind an access point is that it is an addition to an
    Also very interesting. I would have guessed the opposite.

    Thanks for the info!
    Bruce.
     
    Bruce Chastain, Feb 18, 2004
    #5
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.