Beginner's question about 10Mbps and 100 Mbps networks

Discussion in 'Windows Networking' started by Ian, Jul 8, 2004.

  1. Ian

    Ian Guest

    I currently have a small LAN which includes a pc server running XP Pro
    and also a laptop running Win98. Both have 10/100 ethernet network
    cards and the devices connect via an HP Ethertwist hub and twisted pair
    cable. Network traffic between the two devices is currently a maximum
    of 10 Mbps - is it possible to get 100 Mbps performance and if so what
    would I need to upgrade? Thanks in advance for any help.
     
    Ian, Jul 8, 2004
    #1
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  2. Ian

    daytripper Guest

    Yes.
    Replace the hub with a 10/100 switch...
     
    daytripper, Jul 8, 2004
    #2
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  3. Ian

    Ian Guest


    Thanks for the info re the network switch. Are there any brands you'd
    recommend? I only need 4 ports and it's just for home use.
     
    Ian, Jul 11, 2004
    #3
  4. Ian

    Yousuf Khan Guest

    100Mbps Ethernet switches are pretty much old-time technology these days, so
    it doesn't matter about brands anymore. Just get the cheapest ones you can
    find.

    Actually, if you have a highspeed Internet connection, you might want to
    consider buying a broadband router. These things usually include a four-port
    Ethernet switch inside them, and as a bonus you get to share your Internet
    connection for free. Here your choices are: D-link, Linksys, Netgear, SMC,
    etc.

    Yousuf Khan
     
    Yousuf Khan, Jul 11, 2004
    #4
  5. Ian

    daytripper Guest

    I'm brand-agnostic on soho switches, they're so simple to implement now you
    could probably select one while wearing a blindfold and do just fine.

    fwiw, I've been using a Linksys 8-port non-blocking "workgroup" switch for
    years now, uplinked to my router. It just works. But they all should, so buy
    on price...

    /daytripper
     
    daytripper, Jul 11, 2004
    #5
  6. Ian

    Mark Carroll Guest

    I'd probably look at http://tinyurl.com/2n5v2 but also consider
    http://tinyurl.com/yuldu if a few more ports might someday be handy.

    We use a few of those at work and they seem fine and low-hassle.

    -- Mark
     
    Mark Carroll, Jul 11, 2004
    #6
  7. Ian

    CJT Guest

    FWIW, the only switches I've had trouble with are Hawking. I've had
    especially good results with Netgear. I'd put 3Com in the "good"
    group of brand names, too, although I haven't used them recently. In
    the cheaper tier, I've had good results with TrendNet and
    Siemens/Speedstream. Of course there are many others I haven't tried.

    And YMMV, of course. HTH.
     
    CJT, Jul 11, 2004
    #7
  8. Ian

    Mark Carroll Guest

    FWIW, the only switches I've had trouble with are Hawking. I've had
    especially good results with Netgear. I'd put 3Com in the "good"
    group of brand names, too, although I haven't used them recently. In
    the cheaper tier, I've had good results with TrendNet and
    Siemens/Speedstream. Of course there are many others I haven't tried.[/QUOTE]
    (snip)

    Mmmm, yes, we moved to TrendNet because our Hawking switches tended to
    run very hot and die in significant numbers: enough that it seemed
    cheapest in the long term to just not use them for anything important
    any more, replacing them before any of the remainder failed. One
    Hawking switch even sounded like it was arcing. (I still have some
    around, actually - I meant to open them to see if there was any
    obvious design flaw.) It was a pity, because they were cheap, compact,
    and easy to install.

    -- Mark
     
    Mark Carroll, Jul 12, 2004
    #8
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