Airport Client on Non-Airport WiFi Network

Discussion in 'Wireless Internet' started by Michael Nitabach, Feb 20, 2004.

  1. We have successfully networked a Mac with an Airport client card to a
    Netgear MR814 802.11b wireless router. SSID broadcast is off, MAC
    access control is on, and we are using 128-bit WEP.

    The problem is that if the Mac is rebooted, the SSID and WEP key have
    to be manually reentered in the Airport configuration. There does not
    seem to be any way to store this configuration information as a network
    profile so that after rebooting the Mac can reconnect without
    reentering the configuration.

    I am hoping that we are missing something simple here.
     
    Michael Nitabach, Feb 20, 2004
    #1
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  2. Michael Nitabach

    fishfry Guest

    This would only happen if you're running a "closed" network, ie the
    router is set to not broadcast SSID. If so, this is a feature and not a
    problem.
     
    fishfry, Feb 20, 2004
    #2
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  3. It is a feature that presents a problem.
     
    Michael Nitabach, Feb 20, 2004
    #3
  4. On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 15:43:31 -0600, Michael Nitabach spoketh
    No. Turn on SSID broadcast, and problem solved...

    Lars M. Hansen
    www.hansenonline.net
    Remove "bad" from my e-mail address to contact me.
    "If you try to fail, and succeed, which have you done?"
     
    Lars M. Hansen, Feb 20, 2004
    #4
  5. Yes. I don't want to broadcast the SSID.

    Every other 802.11 client I have ever used allows you to save as many
    network profiles as you desire. It lets *you*, the user, identify the
    network you wish to connect to, and with what configuration.

    To the extent that the Airport client does not allow this, it is
    poorly designed. You can call it a "feature", "no problem", "problem
    solved", or whatever you want. Bottom line: It's not letting me do
    what I want to do, and what every other wireless client I have ever
    used lets me do.
     
    Michael Nitabach, Feb 20, 2004
    #5
  6. On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 16:11:01 -0600, Michael Nitabach spoketh
    Broadcasting the SSID is not a significant security risk. I realize that
    you do not wish to do so, and that's fine. However, it seems you have
    only two alternatives: Broadcast the SSID, or toss the Mac...

    Lars M. Hansen
    www.hansenonline.net
    Remove "bad" from my e-mail address to contact me.
    "If you try to fail, and succeed, which have you done?"
     
    Lars M. Hansen, Feb 20, 2004
    #6
  7. Or keep typing in the SSID and WEP key every time the Mac gets
    rebooted.
     
    Michael Nitabach, Feb 20, 2004
    #7
  8. Michael Nitabach

    Diederik Guest

    System Preferences - Network:
    Choose your location
    Show: 'Airport'
    Click the Airport tab
    By default, join 'A specific network'
    Network: <Fill in your SSID>
    Password: <Fill in your WEP-key>

    Don't select 'Allow this computer to create networks'
    Click 'Apply now'
    Allow these settings to your keychain
    You can also lock these setting to prevent further changes by clicking on
    the left bottom button.


    Hope this helped you out,
    Diederik
     
    Diederik, Feb 20, 2004
    #8
  9. Michael Nitabach

    Diederik Guest

    All you have to do is allow your settings to your keychain.
     
    Diederik, Feb 20, 2004
    #9
  10. Michael Nitabach

    AnToNio Guest

    That is exactly what I did, and it works flawlessly!

    In my case I did check the "allow to create networks" (why I don't
    remeber) and that did not cause any problems.
     
    AnToNio, Feb 20, 2004
    #10
  11. Michael Nitabach

    Bob Harris Guest

    Try the following (Mac OS X 10.3 (Panther))

    Network System Preferences
    Airport Tab
    By default join: "A specific network"
    Network: your_ssid_name
    Password: your_WEP_password

    This may solve your problem.

    If you are using a different OS version, then I don't know if this stuff
    will work for you or not.

    Bob Harris
     
    Bob Harris, Feb 20, 2004
    #11
  12. What is the "keychain"?
     
    Michael Nitabach, Feb 21, 2004
    #12
  13. Michael Nitabach

    Diederik Guest

    System Preferences - Keychain

    Use this and remember just one password. All other passwords are stored
    in your keychain.
     
    Diederik, Feb 21, 2004
    #13
  14. Michael Nitabach

    Diederik Guest

    Maybe he's trying to change his settings in the Internet Control Panel.
    You have to do it in the Network Control Panel.
     
    Diederik, Feb 21, 2004
    #14
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