2.5 Meg transfers on 100Mb switched network?

Discussion in 'Linux Networking' started by no body, Jun 24, 2003.

  1. no body

    no body Guest

    I'm doing some nfs file transfers from one box to another over a
    CAT5-to-switch-to-CAT5 connection, both boxes connected at 100 Mb. I've
    noticed some of the files actually go at 2.5 Meg per second. Isn't that two
    and a half times the actual effective rate of 1 Meg per sec that this sort
    of connection should have? How is it happening?

    My guess is nfs is using compression of some sort, but I didn't think nfs
    had compression...
     
    no body, Jun 24, 2003
    #1
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  2. Actuallt if yea take 100Mbits / (8 bits/byte + say 2 for overhead) =
    10MB/sec

    With a 10Mbit ethernet yea can estimate 1MByte top speed in the same manner.

    Hope this helped.
     
    Tobius Manning, Jun 24, 2003
    #2
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  3. No, it's rather less than one quarter of the theoretical maximum rate of
    around 11-12MB/s. It suggests that your network connection isn't very
    efficient, but maybe there is other traffic contending.

    Regards, Ian
     
    Ian Northeast, Jun 24, 2003
    #3
  4. no body

    Alex Yung Guest

    no body () wrote:
    : I'm doing some nfs file transfers from one box to another over a
    : CAT5-to-switch-to-CAT5 connection, both boxes connected at 100 Mb. I've
    : noticed some of the files actually go at 2.5 Meg per second. Isn't that two
    : and a half times the actual effective rate of 1 Meg per sec that this sort
    : of connection should have? How is it happening?

    : My guess is nfs is using compression of some sort, but I didn't think nfs
    : had compression...

    It is my understanding that NFS does not do compression. But your
    1MB/s is 10base connection. If you play with window size options
    under NFS, you should be able to get 4 - 6 MB/s on 100base network.
     
    Alex Yung, Jun 26, 2003
    #4
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